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Turing Phone Cadenza and Turing Monolith Chaconne

 
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BentL
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PostPosted: Friday, 02.Sep.2016 12:17    Post subject: Turing Phone Cadenza and Turing Monolith Chaconne   Reply with quote   

Turing Robotic Industries has intruduced the Turing Phone Cadenza with Swordfish OS based on Sailfish OS, see newsletter:

Quote:
The Outer Blueprint


The Outer Blueprint is a leading edge program designed by TRI to realize the next generation of mobile devices. We've been seriously thinking about ways to dramatically improve our day to day mobile communication and how we use applications, one of which is the practical use of artificial intelligence (AI). We've seen chatbots come and go, but those that remain only serve as a shortcut to basic information such as weather status, street navigation, restaurant choices and internet searches. TRI's research into AI goes further into deep learning and we're interested in knowing how machines can be more beneficial to us. TRI foresees a new machine with far more computing power to serve our daily needs when we need them the most, thus we've dreamed up and have begun development of what we call a "perfectly designed device." We introduce to you - the Turing Phone Cadenza.


The Turing Phone Cadenza is a bold continuation of TRI’s mobile research and the first device in The Outer Blueprint program. After finishing up the development and delivery of the first Turing Phone, the world's first liquid-metal mobile phone, TRI is embarking on another challenge to build the unimaginable. Many have doubted our ability to deliver a product that we promised we would, while many have shared their passion and support for TRI. Although we have faced many obstacles and challenges in our journey to innovate, we've chose to side with those who are keen in helping us shape the future.


[Click for large image]

TRI is able to pivot efficiently and create something as extraordinary as the Turing Phone Cadenza. It is our belief that we can disrupt the status quo by bringing the Turing Phone Cadenza from the future to the present.


I look forward to you joining us in this journey.

- Steve YL Chao (CEO & Chief Architect)

Turing Robotic Industries



"A man provided with paper, pencil, and rubber, and subject to strict discipline, is in effect a universal machine."

- Alan Turing

This will be a seriously high-end smartphone.

--
Bent Laursen


Last edited by BentL on Wednesday, 07.Sep.2016 14:36; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Friday, 02.Sep.2016 13:14    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

This will be a seriously high-end smartphone.


If it ever sees the light of day...
Can't say I would trust TRI too much with their announcements.
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PostPosted: Wednesday, 07.Sep.2016 14:35    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Turing Robotic Industries has intruduced the Turing Monolith Chaconne, a sibling of the Cadenza, see newsletter:

Quote:
The Outer Blueprint Continued

Here’s to the insane, the crazy ones, the misfits, the fools, the rebels, the troublemakers and the ones who see things differently. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they alter things. They lead us down a new path - and while some may see them as insane, we see brilliance - because the ones who are crazy enough to think they can alter the world, are the ones who do.

- Inspired by Steve Jobs


Ever since we provided a glimpse of the Turing Phone Cadenza last Friday we’ve received an overwhelming amount of requests from people all over the world eager to learn more about the Outer Blueprint program. In the coming months we will release a video that will take you behind the scenes of TRI’s R&D lab and how we intend to reimagine the mobile handset. We believe mobile phones are still very far from their full potential. With a growing need for sophisticated artificial intelligence, the computing power needed to facilitate the kind of AI we envision for consumers of all types is much more than what is currently available in the market. We also believe distributed computing is the way mobile technology is heading, hence our exploitation of the concept of multiple CPU integration.

TRI plans on connecting multiple CPUs via WiGig by implementing an ad-hoc driver to the 60GHz channel via on-board USB3.0. This complicated computing process stores a transient matrix in SSD of CPU(1), then it recomputes and shares the transient matrix with the other SSD of CPU(2) simultaneously. This results in the CPUs sharing their computing power in parallel. Such proprietary technology enables TRI to achieve never-seen-before computing power on a mobile device. So what exactly is this technology intended for? The answer is - Computational Intelligence (CI).

TRI is developing a new type of mobile ecosystem built around AI and CI and we may see the very first Artificial Intelligence Program (AIP) on the Cadenza surfacing in 2017. By then, TRI will be inviting developers from all over the world to be a part of this computing revolution.

Some of you may have learned that TRI has an R&D center in the city of Salo, Finland. For those of you that aren’t aware, Salo has had an impeccable history of mobile phone design and production since the early 1990s. TRI has established a manufacturing facility right where Nokia® and Microsoft® used to produce their mobile phone prototypes.


In the coming months TRI will strengthen its presence in Salo and start building prototypes for the Turing Phone Cadenza. Salo has an enormous pool of mobile phone talent who specialize in every possible facet of mobile phone design and production. If there’s one location in the world where the Turing Phone Cadenza can become a reality, it’s Salo, Finland.


TRI R&D and Production Facility in Salo, Finland


The second project in the Outer Blueprint program involves the sibling of the Cadenza. We were very careful in choosing the name to describe this special device with sophisticated AI and CI capabilities. Inspired by Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, we decided to go with the term “Monolith.” Monoliths are long-lived and reliable machines able to survive for millions of years buried in the ground or in space with no apparent damage. They are virtually indestructible and encourage humankind to progress with technological development and space travel.

Behold, the Turing Monolith Chaconne.



Like the Turing Phone Cadenza, the Turing Monolith Chaconne utilizes multiple CPU architecture for parallel computing and is a device that falls in between the mobile phone and tablet categories.


[Click for large image]





In memory of the great violinist Jascha Heifetz, who took violin solo performance to a new dimension, we named the first Turing Monolith - Chaconne. The most impressive musical piece performed by Heifetz, then age 16, was during his 1917 debut performance at Carnegie Hall nearly a hundred years ago. Here’s a link to the original score.



If you think you’re insane enough to want to alter the world, we invite you to be a part of the Turing Phone Cadenza and Turing Monolith Chaconne team. TRI Finland warmly welcomes you. Email us at changetheworld@turingphone.com to subscribe to our team of misfits and rebels.



Until next time,

Syl Chao
CEO and Chief Architect

Turing Robotic Industries

This device will come with a physical keyboard and with even more extreme specifications than the Cadenza.

--
Bent Laursen
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PostPosted: Wednesday, 07.Sep.2016 19:28    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

I guess that all the Vertus were a bargain compared to this.
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PostPosted: Tuesday, 20.Sep.2016 18:35    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

An interview with Steve Chao about the Cadenza and Monolith Chaconne, see TechRadar:

Quote:
The most powerful smartphones ever are coming from a company you've never heard of

"We're a small, young company and we have nothing to lose"

Last year the company generated plenty of buzz with the announcement of its debut phone: a super-secure handset fashioned from virtually unbendable liquid metal. Then earlier this month it revealed the specs of its two new devices - the Cadenza and Monolith Chaconne - to almost overwhelming skepticism and derision.

The response is largely understandable as you glance through the proposed spec sheets for these futuristic super-phones. The Cadenza boasts two (unannounced) Qualcomm Snapdragon 830 chipsets, 12GB of RAM, 1TB of storage and a 60 megapixel camera, while the Monolith Chaconne goes one better by including three 830 chipsets, 18GB of RAM and a slide-out keyboard.

Both are constructed from a Graphene Oxide composite and include Hydrogen fuel cells as part of their hybrid power system.

"People need proof"

Despite the dismissive response from the tech media, TRI CEO and Chief Architect Steve Chao remains unfazed. "I think the reaction was exactly as you should expect. People need to see proof before believing."

Proof is something that TRI has struggled with over the past twelve months. Upon announcing its first phone, the company opened pre-orders with the promise that the handset would be delivered by Christmas 2015.

That date soon evaporated, as did the company's commitment to Google's Android, with the largely untested Jolla Sailfish OS being drafted in as a replacement.

Another delay pushed the handset further into 2016, with the final product now expected to arrive before the end of the year.

The scant consolation to those who handed over more than $600 a year ago is the fact that their orders have been upgraded to the Turing Phone Dark Wyvern model and the company is currently shipping out free-of-charge "evaluation" units before the final production edition arrives - which will include an improved Snapdragon 821 chipset.

"I'm not very concerned about the glitches we've encountered," says Chao when quizzed on whether or not such problems will impact the firm's future projects.

"Our existing customers are highly valued; not only have their orders been upgraded at no additional cost but they have also been automatically enrolled into the Turing Elite program in which they will enjoy far cheaper prices for both the Cadenza and Chaconne when they become available."

"The biggest challenges in smartphone material history"

It's certainly been a bumpy road to market for TRI's first product, but the fledgling firm has arguably encountered issues which even larger and more established companies would struggle with - and as the recent Galaxy Note 7 debacle proves, nobody is perfect.

"I should stress that TRI is entirely funded by its partners without any venture capital funds," Chao explains.

"We had limited resources and we were working to solve one of the biggest challenges in smartphone material history - liquid metal. The delays largely came from the formulation of liquid metal; now we've done it and have harnessed the techniques in producing commercialized liquid metal, we can apply the same methodology to other materials and production processes in the pipeline in order to save time."

The Cadenza and Monolith Chaconne may be little more than specs on a sheet of paper at present, but Chao is keen to stress that he hasn't simply grabbed these numbers out of thin air.

These two phones represent years of research and development, guided by Chao's belief that we're about to enter another phase of seismic change within the mobile tech industry, just like when smartphones took over from dumbphones.

"You can view the specs as two or three smartphones connected with each other," he says. "The challenge is how to make it all fit into a small handheld chassis. We have the schematics of how it should work and the ultimate prototype will be available in the not-so-distant future."

Overkill?

But does a phone really need more than one chipset driving it? And when your average PC only has around 4GB of RAM, surely 12GB in a phone is overkill? Not in TRI's opinion.

"Phones are no longer just phones, they have evolved from a calling device to an all-function digital device that resembles the combination of a desktop computer, camera, GPS navigator, game console and more. We have yet to see the full potential of a phone," says Chao.

"You should look into the future, not the present or the past. One day, phones will surpass the capabilities of desktop computers in both computational power and application processing capabilities. This black hole named 'Phone' will continue to suck in functions from other digital devices until it realizes the vision of Alan Turing's Turing Machine."

Both of TRI's proposed phones mark a massive shift in processing power when compared to modern smartphones, but is it truly necessary to tear up the rulebook and try to shoehorn in more than one chipset when your average consumer is perfectly happy with the gradual evolution of the mobile phone?Is there truly a genuine calling for this kind of raw power, or is it simply boldness for the sake of boldness?

"Consider this – Apple's latest chipset, the A10 Fusion, is superior to the current Snapdragon," replies Chao.

"The Cadenza and Monolith are due to be released in 2018 – at that time, a dual Snapdragon 830 setup will probably be on par with Apple's A11 or A12.

"Why do we need so much power? You really need to drill down into the actual processor performance. A single Snapdragon isn't going to compete with Apple. According to my own calculations, the A10 Fusion is equivalent in power to 1.5 Snapdragon 820s.

"I think by the time the A11 is out, it will be around 1.3 times more powerful than the new Snapdragon 830, so there's always that shortfall to address. Having two Snapdragon 830s connected via the WiGig computation, we're bound to lose a bit of computational power because it's not all in the same chip, unlike Apple's option. If you use just a single 830 chip, there's no way you can beat the iPhone."

This gazing into the future is all well and good, but it's worth remembering that Qualcomm hasn't officially announced the Snapdragon 830 yet, despite TRI confidently including it in the spec list for both phones.

Chao accepts that this move will lead to a healthy amount of skepticism, but insists that his company – just like any other hardware manufacturer – is privy to developments behind the scenes. "Both Samsung and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company are ready for volume production of 10nm chip technology," he explains. "TSMC even has 7nm and 5nm in the works. The Snapdragon 830 will be old news by summer 2017."

With such monstrous specs, price is obviously going to be a concern for both handsets, but Chao admits that TRI isn't aiming for the same market as companies such as Samsung, LG and Sony, and it is focused almost entirely at the high end of the price spectrum.

"If a high end luxury phone can be sold at $10,000, I don't see why we can't contain ours at a reasonable price," he says. "The price of these phones would be far cheaper than the price of two or three high end phones put together."

Learning devices

Much has been made of the claim that these two handsets will be the first of a new breed of "learning" devices, and it is perhaps this aspect of TRI's work that could potentially have the most dramatic effects on the mobile industry as a whole.

"We apply various algorithms within neural network research to go deeper into the realm of 'computational intelligence', an intelligence that can not only learn but is capable of taking partial known factors to pattern match for the best forecast. It is our vision in the era of machine consciousness," says Chao.

At the heart of this new era - TRI hopes - is the custom Swordfish OS, which is based on Jolla's Sailfish, itself an evolution of the abandoned Nokia MeeGo project.

"Swordfish will be the world's first mobile OS that runs multiple CPUs, hence the fact that it'll be coming to the Cadenza, Monolith and Turing Robotic Phone Capriccioso, a third phone which we'll officially announce later this year," he adds.

Based on Linux and offering compatibility with Android applications, Sailfish OS currently powers the first Turing Phone as well as a handful of other devices, but it can hardly be seen as a genuine competitor to Google and Apple.

Jolla and TRI clearly see the reciprocal benefit of working together, and Swordfish could prove to be the step forward that Jolla - which had to layoff half its workforce late last year in an attempt to restructure its debt - so badly needs right now.

As Chao himself says, people require proof before believing lofty claims, and at the moment the only proof the world has that TRI - which has recently relocated to Nokia's old Salo R&D facility in Finland - can pull any of this off is a single, much-delayed smartphone.

However, he's keen to stress that he wants his company to be at the pinnacle of the industry, not just another also-ran which is making up the numbers.

"TRI isn't interested in competing with Android phones from the likes of Huawei and Samsung," he says.

"I think one day we'll go up against Apple, perhaps in the next few years. We're still a small company and we don't have the luxury of our own chip design team. In future TRI may be able to design its own chip, but before that day we're looking to use multiple CPUs in order to mimic cell architecture."

Despite his extravagant predictions, Chao is a realist and knows full well that it's impossible to make such bold statements in the tech industry without a few testing questions being asked and petty insults thrown.

"We're a small, young company and we have nothing to lose," he says. "We're here to disrupt the industry and create significant change. Innovations come mostly from younger companies, like ours.

"What I will say to those who want to cast doubt on what we're doing at TRI is be kind, stay curious, and have an open heart for those who are insane enough to want to change the world."

So there will also be the Turing Robotic Phone Capriccioso.

--
Bent Laursen
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PostPosted: Wednesday, 21.Sep.2016 15:39    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Looks more like an April Fool prank to me though it is still months away
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PostPosted: Wednesday, 21.Sep.2016 16:27    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

"If a high end luxury phone can be sold at $10,000, I don't see why we can't contain ours at a reasonable price," he says. "The price of these phones would be far cheaper than the price of two or three high end phones put together."

"Cheaper than three high end phones put together"... sounds so inviting! What a bargain.
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PostPosted: Sunday, 25.Sep.2016 18:12    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Michal Jerz wrote:
[...]

"Cheaper than three high end phones put together"... sounds so inviting! What a bargain.


Hasn't the Communicators usually been about 1,5 times the price of "regular" smartphones of their time? With inferior hardware?? Then 2 (to 3) times the price for something with full multitasking OS AND superior hardware shouldn't bee all that "wrong".

I would be interested in the one with a keyboard for that price. (I'm still holding on to my E7, since it is the only phone I know of with a keyboard that will function to my needs now. It is then mainly a phone and e-mail-device, as browsing other than simple pages is a struggle with so much bloated web-pages everywhere, that might also be optimized for iOS or Android, to make matters worse...)

So if they can actually deliver them in 2018 I will just have to hope that my E7 will last til then Shocked bazooka Question

(I don't like that they apparently have taken away the headphone-jack though, at least on their current phone... The most important feature of the headphone-jack, is that you can connect it to any kind of hi-fi or PA equipment with just a simple cable. I will usually prefer wireless connection when I am using headphones anyway, you shouldn't keep the phone in your pocket with a cable connected...)
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PostPosted: Monday, 26.Sep.2016 00:13    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

Hasn't the Communicators usually been about 1,5 times the price of "regular" smartphones of their time? With inferior hardware?? Then 2 (to 3) times the price for something with full multitasking OS AND superior hardware shouldn't bee all that "wrong".

In those times Communicators were the only mobile devices offering such features (huge real keyboard, big screen, fax, great speaker phone, office support, email, web browser, etc). And they were from the most reputable manufacturer at that time. They weren't too fast, but people who needed to work with documents, fax or email, etc. on the move had very little to no other choice. Laptops were bulky, with short battery life and without built-in wireless communication. So while Communicators indeed weren't cheap, there wasn't much else in that price range enabling to do such things on the move.

Things have seriously changed since then. Just look around and see how many other options there are now to do such things on the move.

While I would very much like a device with the Communicator's design, I definitely wouldn't pay for it 3 times the price of a high end smartphone because I can find an infinite choice of much cheaper options.

Lastly, I am also wondering what the heck would I need such a powerful dual-CPU setup for on a Sailfish OS device, as long as Sailfish OS does not have any serious native applications. To run old Android apps in SFOS' ancient Android 4.2 runtime? Shocked Or to multitask between the built-in web browser and email client? For this a single traditional quad-core ARM is more than enough, yet many times cheaper.

Yes, it is a great multitasking OS, but there's little software to multitask on it and Jolla does not seem to be willing to do anything to change it anytime soon.
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PostPosted: Monday, 26.Sep.2016 11:35    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

@ gymbo
off topic :
- as browsing other than simple pages is a struggle with so much bloated web-pages everywhere -
I suppose you are using besides Web also : fast Opera Mini ? Slower Opera Mobile as I do ? This reaction for example is in O-Mini on my E7-00 .
Available : m.opera.com and also in Applist .
☺ Regards jApi NL
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PostPosted: Monday, 26.Sep.2016 16:11    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Opera mini is quite good but have tendency to change some page layout and the look.
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PostPosted: Tuesday, 27.Sep.2016 04:31    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

traxx wrote:
Opera mini is quite good but have tendency to change some page layout and the look.


Well, we are wandering a bit off-topic here now (and sorry for that...):

It's not so much better to have the page layout change because web and/or Opera Mobile is not able to render/process the page properly...

But if there is a page I really MUST access, and my E7 is everything I have with me (for the time being I usually have both a tablet AND laptop with me almost always anyway, and, no, I probably don't need them most of the time...), I would try Opera Mini as well. And it will usually "work". But I am "paranoid" enough that I don't like doing all my surfing through compression servers. ("Big Brother" probably know mostly everything about me anyway, I don't really have any delusions about that, but why give the same information to some "little/smaller brothers" as well...??)

Michal Jerz wrote:
In those times Communicators were the only mobile devices offering such features (huge real keyboard, big screen, fax, great speaker phone, office support, email, web browser, etc). And they were from the most reputable manufacturer at that time. They weren't too fast, but people who needed to work with documents, fax or email, etc. on the move had very little to no other choice. Laptops were bulky, with short battery life and without built-in wireless communication. So while Communicators indeed weren't cheap, there wasn't much else in that price range enabling to do such things on the move.


With that size the Turing Monolith Chaconne presumably would be the only option still with a physical keyboard at that time?? Unless something suddenly changed in the "mobile phone world"...

Michal Jerz wrote:
While I would very much like a device with the Communicator's design, I definitely wouldn't pay for it 3 times the price of a high end smartphone because I can find an infinite choice of much cheaper options.


I have paid a premium for inferior hardware with most of the Communicators I have bought, it would be a nice change to pay a premium for premium hardware as well... Surprised Shocked

Michal Jerz wrote:
Lastly, I am also wondering what the heck would I need such a powerful dual-CPU setup for on a Sailfish OS device, as long as Sailfish OS does not have any serious native applications. To run old Android apps in SFOS' ancient Android 4.2 runtime? Shocked Or to multitask between the built-in web browser and email client? For this a single traditional quad-core ARM is more than enough, yet many times cheaper.

Yes, it is a great multitasking OS, but there's little software to multitask on it and Jolla does not seem to be willing to do anything to change it anytime soon.


If the OS doesn't get "wider" support, it would of course not help much that the hardware is good. If Android compatibility works well, that could help, but might make the multitasking pointless, if everything is dependent on that compatibility... But maybe (hopefully??) Turning might help change that (the support/percentage of the OS) as well with their current phone???
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PostPosted: Tuesday, 27.Sep.2016 17:36    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

With that size the Turing Monolith Chaconne presumably would be the only option still with a physical keyboard at that time?? Unless something suddenly changed in the "mobile phone world"...

In the Communicator times, the choice was either the Communicator or a huge, heavy laptop with 1 hour of battery life and no built-in 3G connectivity, so one needed to additionally connect to it a mobile phone (e.g. via Bluetooth or USB) anyway to be able to work on the move.

Whereas now the difference is much smaller because there is an infinite choice of small tablets, mini netbooks, etc., or one can simply get an ultra-thin and ultra-light wireless keyboard and use it with a standard smartphone.

I am not saying that it would be as convenient as a single device with a built-in hardware keyboard, but if the price to pay for such a convenience is $1800 or so then lots of people will choose much cheaper options.

If I needed to have a device allowing me to work with documents on the move and had a choice between either this Turing phone for some $1800 or simply buying a tiny wireless keyboard for $50 for my existing smartphone then I guess I don't need to tell you what would I choose. But maybe I'm simply too poor to shell out $1800 like this.

Quote:

I have paid a premium for inferior hardware with most of the Communicators I have bought, it would be a nice change to pay a premium for premium hardware as well...

Well, while maybe in the Communicators the hardware was always too slow for the features they were providing, in this Turing phone the hardware is IMHO too strong for what it's going to offer, only unnecessarily boosting its price beyond reasonable levels. I mean, I don't mind powerful hardware at all, but only if there's any serious USE of it, or at least if it doesn't cost me 3x more than needed. On an OS lacking almost any native software, I can't see what would I need SIXTEEN CORES and 12 GIGABYTES of RAM for, even in 2018. Neither my desktop (6-core Xeon, 12 GB ) nor my laptop (4-core i7 8 GB ) have this much, yet still I have never really needed even that. I can have Momentics SDK, BB10 simulator in a VMWare virtual machine and Photoshop CS running simultaneously and it's still just a few % of CPU time and half of the memory, so I just can't imagine what would I need to do on this phone to utilize even fraction of its resources. So back to the original question: why pay $1800 for something that cannot be utilized?

Quote:

If the OS doesn't get "wider" support, it would of course not help much that the hardware is good. If Android compatibility works well, that could help, but might make the multitasking pointless, if everything is dependent on that compatibility... But maybe (hopefully??) Turning might help change that (the support/percentage of the OS) as well with their current phone???

No matter if the Android runtime works or not, it got stuck at Android 4.2 version. Google doesn't allow to use newer Android versions or Google Play services on non-Android devices. Before this phone comes out, Android 4.2 will be as ancient as now is Android 1.2. Majority of apps you'll be trying to use will either complain about the Android API level being too old or about the lack of required Google services...

At the same time, absolutely NOTHING has been done to start building the native ecosystem. Nothing whatsoever. So, once again: what would I need 16 CPU cores and 12 GB of RAM for if there's no native apps and the Android runtime got stuck at already now heavily dated 4.2 KitKat version? Paying $1800 and having one CPU permanently running at 10% of its clock and the other one halted completely due to no CPU utilization by (non-existent) apps, and the same for 12 GB of RAM, is IMHO completely pointless.

Things might look different if there was any serious software for Sailfish OS, but how can this change if no one even tries to change it.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 29.Dec.2016 19:59    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

The Turing Monolith Chaconne has been named vaporware, see ExtremeTech:

Quote:
Vaporware: 2016’s wall of shame

With this blighted year finally drawing to a close, it’s time to review our favorite products that didn’t manage to launch this year. Vaporware was a many-splendored thing this year, with entries from the usual suspects (gaming hardware, video games) and the highly unusual (when was the last time you heard about a multi-billion dollar corporation pulling a shrug emoji and hoping no one noticed?) From the ignominious to the merely pathetic, we’ve rounded up this years’ “best” entries.

[...]

The Turing Monolith Chaconne

3 SoCs. 18 GB of RAM. 768GB of storage. 32 seconds of battery life (just kidding, it uses a 120Wh fuel cell). Hacker-proof. TROLOLOLOL. Turing Phones are conceptware that totally redefine wishful thinking. In a recent newsletter, Turing hopefully waggled its apparent R&D cred, and teased a pair of outrageously ambitious mobile phones, the Turing Phone Cadenza and its “sibling” the Monolith Chaconne. To add some visual flair, they shopped a mockup of their phone onto an ESO artist’s illustration of Proxima b in orbit around Proxima Centauri, because space and planets and stuff. They didn’t even bother to credit it.

But I digress. The Monolith isn’t even on Turing’s website. Instead, there’s a thing called the Dark Wyvern, and a related DW Glaedr. Turing gave CNET prototypes of a Turing Phone to handle, and they’re anxious to collect preorders, but the prototypes were dummies running Android. Now Turing has no fewer than three theoretical devices in the works, and they’re apparently also conducting a project called the Outer Blueprint, which is supposed to “realize the next generation of mobile devices” by using a trio of Snapdragon 830s in parallel to give their phones the computing power to use robust AI. But the claimed specs keep reaching skyward, and the buzzwords and names keep dropping — and whatever it is they’re featuring on their glossy, content-free website, it’s always going to enter production real soon now, next year, for sure.

This is Turing’s own PR image. And the contrast is terrible. And who or what is A.L.A.N.? H.A.L.’s spiritual successor, I presume.

Are they crazy insane, or insane crazy? You decide:

Quote:
With a growing need for sophisticated artificial intelligence, the computing power needed to facilitate the kind of AI we envision for consumers of all types is much more than what is currently available in the market. We also believe distributed computing is the way mobile technology is heading, hence our exploitation of the concept of multiple CPU integration.

TRI plans on connecting multiple CPUs via WiGig by implementing an ad-hoc driver to the 60GHz channel via on-board USB3.0. This complicated computing process stores a transient matrix in SSD of CPU(1), then it recomputes and shares the transient matrix with the other SSD of CPU(2) simultaneously. This results in the CPUs sharing their computing power in parallel. Such proprietary technology enables TRI to achieve never-seen-before computing power on a mobile device.

That’s our personal vaporware list for 2016 — got any products you think qualify? Sound off in the comments below.

The article is not entirely fair as the Turing Monolith Chaconne is first supposed to launch in 2018. But I still understand the sentiment.

--
Bent Laursen
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