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BB10 Killing Phase 2 started

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AVR4000
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PostPosted: Thursday, 06.Apr.2017 13:21    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

The only thing that can save QNX/BB10 is the creation of an independent QNX Inc managing development and support for the system. Compatibility with Linux drivers would be appropriate if it can be arranged OR creation of them for Snapdragon 6xx and 8xx series.

A key issue is the inability of people to think critically, especially when it comes to the interpretation of sales numbers and so on. I am talking about all anti-BB10 propaganda that have been circulating, especially phrases such as 'unable to compete with Android' and so on or that everything is about the 'app gap' ignoring the true causes.

Community support is a great idea *if it is an open platform* but a disaster for a closed/proprietary one since there are no available source code, which in turn hamper development. Thinking that CrackBerry can support a closed system as BB10 is a bad joke and will just undermine things even more.

I am still hoping that QNX will be sold to an independent company, which then create a new QNX OS with support for embedded systems and also Snapdragon 6xx and 8xx for smartphones and tablets, thus making it operational on standard hardware, thus attracting OEMs that can take 'off the shelf' designs and use the system.

The history has shown the dangers of platforms that are completely under control of *one* company only. Success is built on platforms supported by different OEMs and I think Android, Symbian and PocketPC/Windows Mobile is the best proofs for the thesis.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 06.Apr.2017 14:16    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Linux driver compatibility for QNX is close to impossible. QNX and Linux driver architecture are fundamentally different. In order to get system support for QNX you basically have to port the Linux drivers to the QNX architecture which requires a lot of man power.

QNX will likely to end up is some US company who cans the OS completely and just use technology parts from. Look what happened to Symbian, it was bought up and canned, nowhere to be seen ever again.

As far as I know, QNX is dead, not only in BB10 but everywhere. Companies are leaving in herds from QNX right now.
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Michal Jerz
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PostPosted: Thursday, 06.Apr.2017 20:51    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:
'unable to compete with Android' and so on or that everything is about the 'app gap' ignoring the true causes.


The sad truth is that no one is as much responsible for the famous "app gap" (and therefore not being able to compete with Android) as BlackBerry themselves. They literally ENFORCED it.

They restricted access to so many important functions and APIs that literally tens of thousands of great and useful native apps (easily doable on Android or even quite restricted iOS) simply could not be made as developers couldn't access those features (they have permissions reserved only for BlackBerry). Developers spent 4 years repeatedly requesting those features to be made available in order to be able to make apps using them, to no avail.

The platform was so badly harmed with countless idiotic restrictions making it impossible to create advanced apps, while BlackBerry kept whining about "app gap". I have something like 20-30 projects that I started to code and left half-way due to not being able to use functions they needed. I only wasted precious time.

This contradicted the whole idea of a permission-based system, where it is the user who's supposed to be in control of what an app could be allowed to do, not the manufacturer. Even funnier, when it comes to the most sensitive permissions that the user should fully control, like e.g. Internet access, on BB10 they are just granted automatically (the user is not asked to allow or deny it nor can change it later), so it has nothing to do with security but only with lack of good reasoning. Most of the restrictions are completely idiotic, like e.g. that an application could turn WiFi ON but it couldn't turn it OFF (whereas it is potentially much more dangerous to allow an app to connect to the Internet without user's knowledge than to disconnect from it) or that audio could be recorded through the microphone but not internally (whereas it is much more dangerous to be able to spy on whatever the user says than to just be able to record apps' sounds, which the microphone also captures anyway, just with much worse quality), and so on. All of them were technically possible and fully implemented, just intentionally restricted from developers' access. The list of such amazing and senseless restrictions could go on for many pages and prevented creation of countless applications. Funniest of all, an Android app lauched on BB10 could use many of such features, only a native app couldn't. So, again, nothing to do with security.

And then they switched to Android, which allows the developer to freely use all such features on a BlackBerry Android phone, and they don't seem to have any problem with that and call it "secure".

Add to it that dungeon-like un-browseable app store where people can't find anything and mostly only view the front page where always the same apps have been featured since ever and you have the best recipe for "app gap" disaster because if developers couldn't make any advanced apps and sell even those simple ones (due to people not finding their apps in the store) then they were just leaving in masses.

Those two things alone killed this platform, it didn't take much else. Outdated and underpowered hardware only helped it.

=====

Today's CrackBerry headline is "BlackBerry begins rollout of April Android security update". I find it endlessly amusing how that "secure Android" takes such MONTHLY security patches (I can't recall a single month without one) while users of those Android phones blindly believe they are a fraction as secure as BB10 which hasn't had a security patch for years and still doesn't need any.

An even funnier headline is that Chen has just said that "We make it our business not to know your business", which is actually 100% true as Chen has already proved that developers' and customers' business definitely isn't of his interest if he withdraws support for his products overnight and directs everyone to look for help on fan sites. At least he's honest this time, finally.
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PostPosted: Friday, 07.Apr.2017 13:48    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

The idea of restricting API access for developers and to lock the system down is the two worst things I can think of in OS design. It is one thing to aim for security and implement solutions aimed at protecting the system from malicious code but providing 'dual standards' where the manufacturer are free to do whatever they want with APIs etc, while restricting users and developers severely is just a complete stupidity.

I think the major issue with BB10 was that BlackBerry made it an in-house platform. I.e. a platform fully controlled by them and we know how it typically ends - namely that sooner or later the company will 'loose interest' in it (for different reasons such as acting in the interest of competitors or economical ones), thus followed by actions aimed at phasing it out only to be replaced by an externally sourced system.

BB10.x would have been a success *if* QNX had been an independent company (or a company where BlackBerry had shares together with other OEMs) since it would have broaden the appeal of the platform - and protected it from getting killed off.

Making it compatible with Linux compatible hardware, either by creating a new system or by developing appropriate support for Snapdragon 4xx, 6xx and 8xx would be perfectly doable and the preferred route.

I think every 'in house' platform will live under the constant threat of its maker to change their mind and opt for an 'easy solution' - i.e. a system sourced from an external partner.

Edit: Regarding security patches. I think it is a complicated issue - the question is what kind of issues there are and how the system security model should be designed. The best thing is a system that mange to balance a high security level with openness and flexibility, perhaps with user choice (i.e. corporations can configure it for maximum security, while customers who prioritize more freedom can select a different level).

The problem with BlackBerry Android is its restrictions, which also put a lot of pressure on the company to actually update the system. Since they offer a locked bootloader and everything, they should provide updates for a couple of years rather than abandoning their devices early. It would have been better if they had used their resources on BB10 - actually created an independent QNX Inc and then used the system, while marketing it toward other OEMs than the current situation.
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PostPosted: Tuesday, 25.Apr.2017 19:08    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

It is one thing to aim for security and implement solutions aimed at protecting the system from malicious code


Locking down access to some APIs or specific functions for security reasons is fully understood. As long as it really has anything to do with security. I don't mind having to trade some functionality (and some programming possibilities) for much increased security of my device and my data. And indeed, many restrictions do have valid security background, and it's OK because it is them what makes my BB10 phones so secure.

But there are also countless restrictions which have absolutely nothing to do with security or actually any other reasonable purpose I can think of. They only severely restrict developers' abilities to make great useful applications, while not really giving anything in exchange.

Like I wrote earlier, there's just no valid explanation for being able to turn WiFi on programatically but no way to turn it off, whereas it is actually much more insecure that an application can enable WiFi without user's knowledge than that it can turn it off. Moreover, there exists a permission on BB10 for WiFi control ("access_wifi_public") so it's completely irrational that this permission is granted automatically and the user is not prompted to accept/deny it nor can change it later. What's the use of a permission that the user cannot control? And why at all a permission to control WiFi if it only allows turning it on but not off? Et cetera.

Similarly, the Internet permission (allowing an app to connect to the Internet) is also granted automatically and the user has no control over it (in fact, the user is not even informed that an app he installs has requested and has been automatically granted this permission). What does it have to do with security? Absolutely nothing...

Well, maybe it would have evolved into something more reasonable, if Chen didn't kill BB10 development already in late 2013 / early 2014. Since then only minor fixes had been developed rather than any system-wide improvements and ehancements, so we have what we have...

Quote:

I think the major issue with BB10 was that BlackBerry made it an in-house platform.

Fully agreed. And not only an in-house platform but also a platform restricted to phones only. I wrote here years ago that BB10 was an ideal OS (so resource efficient, stable, secure, etc.) for lots of other devices like e.g. Smart TVs, and obviously also tablets.

But after they scr*wed up with the Playbook (which wasn't even BB10 but some kind of incomplete pre-release of it) they never touched anything else again, nor did they even just bother to release a fully functional BB10 upgrade for all the Playbook owners. Yet another example of how a company that wants itself to be seen as the most reliable and trustworthy on the market has been treating its customers.

But another thing has been their permanent absolute lack of promotion. Not only of BB10 itself but QNX in general. Look, in their press releases they brag about some 30% or so of car audio systems being powered by QNX, which is really an impressive figure. But who knows about it? No one at all. And surely not a single person out of all the millions of people who own such cars and have absolutely no clue that their multimedia system is QNX-powered (or that such a thing as "QNX" exists at all). If Apple makes such an iOS-based multimedia system for cars, every person on this planet will know about it because it will be promoted ad nauseam and it will show Apple logo as the first thing you see whenever you enter your car. Whereas the QNX-based solution never shows anything - neither QNX logo, nor BlackBerry logo, nor anything else. It is just INSANE how the only truly global and massive product they had was not used at all to promote their brand and their OS, whereas they kept whining about hardly anyone even knowing about the existence of their platform and their marketshare kept shrinking from 6% to zero. I can easily imagine that if only all those millions of car owners knew that the multimedia system in their cars is QNX and BB10 smartphones are QNX as well, it would surely make part of them willing to at least check a BB10 smartphone, so it would DRASTICALLY increase public awareness about the existence of such a smartphone OS.

But no. They didn't do even just that.
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PostPosted: Tuesday, 12.Sep.2017 18:11    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

BlackBerry at its best:

- officially confirmed that Priv won't get an upgrade to Nougat (let alone Oreo)
- Nougat upgrade for DTEK series "very unlikely".

Funny how they excused it: "Priv already got an upgrade to Marshmallow" Smile

So that's how buying BlackBerry Android phones looks like: devices with locked bootloader, with no upgrades from the maker and no possibility to install any unofficial ones...

The KeyOne is said to get Oreo at some point, but that's probably all it'll get, too.
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PostPosted: Tuesday, 12.Sep.2017 20:52    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Michal Jerz wrote:
BlackBerry at its best:

- officially confirmed that Priv won't get an upgrade to Nougat (let alone Oreo)


Trust me, that's the best thing BB could've done. The Priv deserves to eternally rot in the depths of oblivion.
Can't speak for the other ones, though. Very Happy

Anyway, are they going to release any new phones instead? I don't really follow on their actions lately (who does, heh). Or are they actually going through that "focusing on software" thing that I recall them stating earlier?

In any case, even switching to Android is turning out to be a failure. Frankly, I don't think they should be taken seriously anymore. Splendid job, BB. Splendid job. Smile
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PostPosted: Wednesday, 13.Sep.2017 05:59    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

Trust me, that's the best thing BB could've done. The Priv deserves to eternally rot in the depths of oblivion.

Sure, but I doubt it would make all those who bought it feel any better... They paid a lot of money and ended up with a non-upgradeable brick, as due to a locked bootloader (that BBRY calls a security feature Very Happy) they can't flash it with anything that the manufacturer hasn't officially blessed. Same for all the DTEKs. That's the very reason why I will NEVER buy an Android phone with a locked bootloader.

Anyway, any excuses that the Priv is too slow or something to get upgrades are just false, because Android 7.x works fine even on my ancient Nexus 4, and Oreo (Lineage 15) is also coming soon. The truth is that BBRY simply didn't bother to make any further Android upgrades for their devices, which shows that they suck big time in software department, too.

As for phones, they don't make any phones anymore. They licensed their brand to Chinese and all new phones (including the KeyOne) are made by Chinese with BBRY logo. BBRY has little to do with them other than getting some license fees and making a few apps which come preinstalled on them.

P.S. Funny thing.... I've always thought that a set-top-box from BlackBerry with BB10 onboard would have been a big thing, especially in times when there was a high demand for such devices. And once the smart TV feature got incorporated into TV sets, they could have licensed the OS to some TV manufacturers. Guess what I've discovered lately..... They had a set-top-box ready for release, and they just dumped it.

http://www.bbnews.pl/2017/08/blackberry-cyclone-prototyp-ponownie-na-a ukcji/

(in Polish but with nice pictures of the prototype)

Tablet - dumped. Smart TV box - dumped. Smartphones - dumped in less than a year, as soon as Chen came. Amazing company. Even better than Nokia. Let's see how much longer it'll take them to kill the whole QNX platform and their QNX-based automotive business.
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PostPosted: Wednesday, 13.Sep.2017 14:31    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

The way BB handles the Priv is like Sony Ericsson and the P990i/P1i/G700/G900 and the X1 all over again. Similar lack of updates and similar excuses (such as the X1 being "designed for WM 6.1" when it was planned to run 6.5 originally).

BB combine the worst of the worst here:

1. Locked bootloader
2. Horrible update management

Number 1 could be "OK" (it is with a lot of hesitation I say it) provided that ALL BB Androids receive at least THREE major system updates from the version they were shipped with (i.e. a BB running Lollipop would receive Marshmallow, Nougat and Oreo followed by perhaps another two years of security updating).

As it is now, the rule become clear: Since BB provide the combination of locked BL AND terrible updating, their devices become very unattractive. It doesn't matter that the Wistron made Priv or TCL made DTEK50/60 were whatever they want to call them - they sold them as "secure devices" and an important part here is... updates. It is like selling a "secure computer" running Windows XP (back in the days) and then tell the customers that Windows 7, 8 or 10 won't be provided "because this computer was just an experiment of our new licensing deals" or whatever the argument are (the partners couldn't be brought together is just as amusing).

So to recap: A Snapdragon 808 device made by Wistron "can't be updated" because they can't get the partners together? What partners? It contain standard hardware with a Qualcomm chipset? So what is so "special" about it? Other manufacturers are able to update their devices so what gives?

It would be more honest to simply declare: "The Priv didn't meet our sales targets and it would be too costly for providing an update - because of this, we will implement an exchange program where you can get a new KeyOne at a discounted price when returning your device". It would be more honest and not as degrading for the brand.

Treating the DTEK50/60 as "beta devices where we tried our new licensing deal" as an excuse for not updating them is even more amusing but also disastrous. So BB are selling beta devices? They didn't tell their customers...

It seems like BB or rather John Chen didn't like to sell devices running BB10.x and after transition to Android, that lack of interest seems to persist. Biting the customers by abandoning the Priv (a device running Lollipop when Marshmallow were already out) and the DTEK series is like stating that "we don't want customers!"

Since I started to flash my device in 2009 (Xperia X1) I have always followed a simple rule:

ONLY BUY DEVICES WITH CUSTOM ROM SUPPORT!

Locked bootloader is an immediate dealbreaker. No OEM is reliable when it comes to updating management (not even Apple since they tend to a/make the device slow after a while and b/you can't downgrade so you are stuck when you realize it). The most reliable way is by having the ability to both upgrade and downgrade the system AND getting custom ROM support since the latter is "power to the people" - i.e. users providing updates for other users. I.e. they are interested in making the device better rather than selling a new one.

BlackBerry probably think that abandoning devices will cause people to buy new ones. It doesn't work that way, people are getting a different brand instead.

It seems like John Chen is as clueless when it comes to Android as he is with BB10.x and QNX. It remind me a bit of when Nokia went WP7 and then all Lumia 800/900 owners had to buy new devices when WP8 came out...
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 03:11    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

So to recap: A Snapdragon 808 device made by Wistron "can't be updated" because they can't get the partners together? What partners? It contain standard hardware with a Qualcomm chipset? So what is so "special" about it? Other manufacturers are able to update their devices so what gives?

As far as I know, in case of those two or three initial Android devices which were still released as BlackBerry's own products, updates are served from BlackBerry servers, just like in case of BB10. So I can't see what any "partners" can have to do with it. They MIGHT release an OS upgrade the same way as they regularly release Android security patches for those devices (and the same way they released the Marshmallow update), if they only WANTED. Does Apple ask Foxconn for permission to release iOS update? What a silly excuse.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 14:13    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Michal Jerz wrote:
[...]

As far as I know, in case of those two or three initial Android devices which were still released as BlackBerry's own products, updates are served from BlackBerry servers, just like in case of BB10. So I can't see what any "partners" can have to do with it. They MIGHT release an OS upgrade the same way as they regularly release Android security patches for those devices (and the same way they released the Marshmallow update), if they only WANTED. Does Apple ask Foxconn for permission to release iOS update? What a silly excuse.


I think the Wistron/BB Priv is the only device "made by BBRY" since the DTEK50 and 60 are... TCL. I haven't checked any disassemblies of the Priv but I feel pretty sure that the motherboard is a reference design (considering the use of Qualcomm, which is a very common choice due to them being able to deliver complete LTE support and everything) rather than something "BB designed".

Most Qualcomm based devices are very similar on a hardware level and I don't see why the Priv is any different.

It is pretty obvious that BB assume their customers don't know how Android works, thus leading to such a BS explanation as to why they are unable to update the device. If the Priv had been based on a MediaTek chipset I could have been a bit more understanding since MT is notorious for not providing sources (you have to PAY for them as an OEM, thus causing MT devices to being abandoned regularly) but not with a Snapdragon.

I can bet that XDA would have a working Lineage OS 14.1 up and running on the Priv within one-two weeks if the bootloader would be unlockable.

Next step here will be Oreo and KeyOne. It would be amusing beyond words if they don't update it...

The track record of BB seems to be similar to Sony Ericsson here - they launch FOUR devices and can't get their act together with updating them. Even worse: They are essentially sold at a price premium, as "flagships" (even if the KeyOne is mid-range with a Snapdragon 625 but that isn't what the price tag indicate) AND still not proper support - from a "security focused" brand.

I think BB is the "insecurity focused" brand now, paired with as serious "lock-down urge" as Apple (the iPhone is still the most locked down device in the market, especially when it comes to flashing where it is DRM galore and locked bootloader Grand Extra Luxe).
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 21:51    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

Most Qualcomm based devices are very similar on a hardware level and I don't see why the Priv is any different.

I'm not sure if there were any changes in Android Nougat requiring any modification of hardware drivers. And if not then they probably have all drivers from Marshmallow. Shortly speaking, they just don't give a ****, that's the whole reason.
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PostPosted: Friday, 15.Sep.2017 15:40    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Michal Jerz wrote:
[...]

I'm not sure if there were any changes in Android Nougat requiring any modification of hardware drivers. And if not then they probably have all drivers from Marshmallow. Shortly speaking, they just don't give a ****, that's the whole reason.


There is no valid excuse regarding drivers in this case - everything needed for getting Nougat up and running on a Snapdragon 808 based device is... readily available. Qualcomm is actually pretty decent to work with in this regard (way better than MediaTek....).

There are differences between Marshmallow and Nougat but not in such a way that there are any proper reasons why a Snapdragon 808 device launched late 2015 can't receive an update. The only devices that were prevented from it are those based on the 800/801 because Google introduced strict requirements for graphics support and Qualcomm decided not to ship updated drivers - thus eliminating official Nougat for everything 800/801 based.

It doesn't affect the 808/810 - updated Nougat drivers are available from Qualcomm.

BlackBerry just demonstrated that they are as bad as Sony Ericsson when it comes to aftermarket support and that buying devices from them is a terrible idea.

It is like their announcement regarding DTEK50/60: They *are* partnered with TCL so in what way are they "test devices"!? They entered a partnership with TCL that still stand so the excuse doesn't make any sense.

If this is John Chen operating again and again I must say this: Avoid any BB device as long as that guy is a manager. Probably the worst Android OEM right now considering their level of "support".

It is also amusing that the Priv landed a couple of months AFTER Marshmallow had launched - running 5.1.1 and they think that people are going to be "happy" about them "updating" the system to something that should have been preinstalled....

So here we have the "secure" BlackBerry where security doesn't matter much since OS updates shouldn't be expected. You get "security patches" but don't expect the OS itself to be updated!

The BB "security" seems to be "Root of Trust", "DM-Verity" and a locked bootloader. Running updated operating systems are not part of the equation.

I guess the dream of BB must be to sell new devices every year when Google introduce a new Android version...Wink

Why not issue a new type of updating prompt: "Dear Customer, your KeyOne is now one year old and Google just introduced Android P. In order to enjoy the high security of BlackBerry, please trade your device in for a $50 rebate on the new KeyOne 2!"

"Please buy a new BlackBerry every year when Google update Android. Best regards, John Chen!"

"A BlackBerry is like a box of chocolates - You never know if it is a beta version. Only John Chen knows but he want to give the customer some piece of mind."

"When you pay the price premium to get a BlackBerry, you are still not guaranteed anything, especially NOT new Android versions."

"BlackBerry - The most secure [Old Android version] device in the market!" (This slogan is rolled out after a new update, i.e. the Priv is now the most secure Marshmallow device etc.)

John Chen on updates: "System updates are not particularly important. People should buy a new BlackBerry if they want a new version. They must understand that we are a small company with a need for extra revenue!"
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PostPosted: Friday, 15.Sep.2017 19:47    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

BlackBerry just demonstrated that they are as bad as Sony Ericsson

If you were a BB10 developer, you would have known how true this sentence is... The BlackBerry World app store has always been managed in a way that was actually suppressing and scaring away developers. Just imagine that they officially invented such a silly thing as "Elite Developers" (mostly a few buddies) and only those selected "Elite" ones were promoted. Their apps were occupying the store's front page all the time (and they still do even now, even though majority of them haven't been updated for years and even though every BB10 user knows them for years so it makes no sense to promote them) while normal developers had to beg for promotion and wait weeks or months to get there once and for just one week, so thousands of great apps went completely unnoticed by anyone, and as all those developers weren't getting any sales so they just left.

Another brilliant idea was to stubbornly restrict whatever possible, and this way prevent the creation of lots of useful applications which just couldn't be made due to those restrictions. I understand security reasons (especially in an OS meant to be the most secure one) but some things just didn't make absolutely any sense. A developer could switch WiFi on, but couldn't switch it off - what sense does it make? Isn't the possibility to switch WiFi on (and transfer some data to somewhere) actually much more dangerous than switching it off (and thus not being able to send any sensitive data)? But they remained deaf to requests. Or another example: you can change a wallpaper programatically, but every change causes a "Wallpaper has been changed" warning to be shown right in the middle of the screen. What for?? If the wallpaper changes, the user sees it anyway. As people always wanted to have some kind of "live wallpaper" feature (not supported on BB10) in some of my apps I used the ability to change wallpapers programatically to display some live updated content on the Lock or Home screen (I programmatically "print" the live information onto an image and then set it as wallpaper). But I need to do it very rarely or else those "Wallpaper has changed" warnings popping up all the time would become really troublesome for the user. This prevented me from being able to offer any frequently updated live content, like e.g. weather information on the Lock screen updated every hour or so, or any other frequently updated information (e.g. current detailed location / address).

This way (suppressing thousands of developers by only promoting a few selected ones, and by locking up dozens of useful OS functions) they caused lots of developers to leave and prevented the creation of tens of thousands of high quality apps. And then Chen whined about "app gap" which "killed the platform".
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PostPosted: Saturday, 16.Sep.2017 13:22    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

I call John Chen the "Rice Guy" for a reason - I think he would do better managing a rice field than a technological corporation.

It is like that theory "BB10.x was killed because of a desire to eliminate non-US based systems". OK, fine theory but some problems in this particular case: The way BB manage Android. If everything is about a "clever plan" about replacing BB10.x with Android due to certain forces working behind the scenes in their pursuit of US dominance - I say this: Why are BB now doing similar mistakes with their "new baby" as before?

I got a strong feeling that this is a clueless company with very little sense in the area of product development. I think the list of strangeness are long here and they seem to be as bad with Android as they ever were with BB10.x.

My conclusion is that this company shouldn't engage too much in device development but rather concentrate on software and licensing to other OEMs. I think they are better in developing software such as operating systems and applications but terrible when we talk integration of them with hardware (and developer support seems to be a bit too advanced as well considering the way they handle permissions etc).

John "Rice Guy" Chen killed BB10.x himself and now he is as bad when it comes to Android (if that platform relied on BB for its survival - it would be game over right now....).

It is still downright amusing that BB still don't get certain things:

1. The system has to be treated seriously INCLUDING updates - especially for a "security focused" company.
2. Developer support is important and to be treated seriously.
3. A "Business/Security Focused" company should offer the following type of devices -

I. Full touch
II. Portrait keyboard (i.e. classic BB style)
III. Landscape keyboard with wide screen (think Communicator or N900/N950)
IV. Phablet with detachable keyboard (landscape oriented) using a technology like "The Other Half" to automatically switch the device to "keyboard/tablet mode" when it is attached and opened.
V. Keyboard slider (Priv style).

This give us five distinct devices - update them every year and it would work as a way of building customer confidence.

BlackBerry seems to be as hopeless when it comes to hardware today as they were before with BB10.x. It seems like they just "don't get it" when we are talking portfolio and support. Sony Ericsson that gave us smartphones without GPS and regular 3G, while putting GPS and HSDPA in feature phones are the closest analogue when we are talking clueless "strategies".

It is also incomprehensible that BB didn't even get a clue about running an app store properly since it seems like their way of doing it is the worst of the worst.

I think this company need to replace its management with people that have a clue about product development and support.

The current situation is this:

BlackBerry make great software (I use it myself) BUT don't buy a device from them. Get the device elsewhere and install their apps on it. Best of both worlds.

Buying a device from BB is a disaster since you are left without support and the concept of "system updates" remain as alien as ever. I guess they don't know what it is, they are like: "But we shipped this device with this version, updates must mean bug fixing, right? If you want a newer system - they should buy a new device from us, right? Like it was back in 2005...?"
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