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Nokia continues to FINISH OFF MeeGo, Symbian and ITSELF

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Michal Jerz
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PostPosted: Friday, 01.Sep.2017 01:00    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

I had the Vivaz as my only Series 60v5 device

Indeed, the Vivaz (released in March 2010) and also its predecessor Satio/Idou (released in mid 2009) were very powerful devices. Vivaz had a 720 MHz Cortex-A8 CPU (and Satio had a 600 MHz one) with fast PowerVR SGX GPUs. They were faster than the Nokia N8 released only in late 2010 and the E7 in 2011.

http://my-symbian.com/s60v3/review_vivaz_pro.php

Just to compare, at the very same time when Omnia HD and Satio came out in 2009, both with 600 MHz CPUs and fast GPUs, Nokia (already feared of the rising Android and iOS competition) released the PATHETICALLY SLOW 5800 XpressMusic (that was supposed to be their new touch-enabled S60 5th Edition flagship) with the very same old cr*ppy 434 MHz single-core GPU-less Freescale ARM11 as on the infamous N97. And they must have considered it as high-end, for on lower models like the 5730 XM they used.... an underclocked 369 MHz version.

CAN YOU BELIEVE that just when the market REJECTS and condemns the N97 as slow as hell beyond usability, they use the very same CPU on a multimedia (XpressMusic) 5th Edition device meant to compete with iPhone, and on lower models they use an even slower CPU? Oh, and guess what they used in the N97 Mini, i.e. a model that was meant to REPLACE the N97. I'm sure you guessed it - yes, it was the same 434 MHz cr*p.

And just when the 720 MHz SE Vivaz came out in early 2010, Nokia at the same time released the X6 with..... guess what.... the same cr*ppy 434 MHz CPU.

ZERO progress between 2008 and late 2010. And that's while they were already sh*tting their pants in fear of the rising iPhone and Android marketshare, so if iOS and Android didn't exist they'd probably keep using that slow as f**k CPU until today.

It's actually a miracle that they used a 600 MHz TI OMAP 3430 CPU with PowerVR SGX GPU in the N900, but that's only because Linux was much more demanding than Symbian and it simply wouldn't work on a 434 MHz Freescale cr*p. Well, and it actually still didn't work well on 600 MHz, either, of which the best proof was that everyone was getting really pleased with the N900 only after overclocking it to 800-900 MHz and tweaking swap usage (heavily utilized due to too little RAM). Only the N9 brought hardware specs that also the N900 should have had.

Anyway, it all just confirms what I wrote earlier:

1) Why did Sony Ericsson wake up and started using such decent hardware specs as on the Satio and Vivaz only in late 2009 and 2010, i.e. after freaking SIX+ YEARS of making severely underpowered 156-208 MHz ARM9 smartphones? Gosh, the P1i still had that damn slow 208 MHz ARM9 CPU in 2007-2008! That's what killed their own great UIQ platform and forced them to switch to the inferior S60. They completely wasted all the years when they had a chance to make UIQ one of the leading smartphone platforms, and they woke up only when competition with Android and iOS (whom by using such underpowered hadware they literally made space on the market for) forced them to finally start offering good hardware.

2) Even when other S60 phone makers like Sony Ericsson (Vivaz, Satio), Samsung (Omnia HD) etc. finally started offering powerful S60 smartphones, it still didin't make Nokia improve their hardware specs by an inch! It took Nokia until late 2010 (N8 ) and early 2011 (E7) to offer as powerful CPU as what the Omnia HD or the SE Satio had in early 2009, not to even mention the Vivaz's 720 MHz one.

The problem was that it was Nokia who was selling some 90% of Symbian devices (and was known as THE MAKER OF SYMBIAN), so as long as Nokia kept using slow CPUs (i.e. almost until the very end) Symbian was commonly seen as slow and no one even wanted to bother to check devices like Omnia HD or Vivaz from much less popular brands, assuming that they must have been just as poor as the ones offered by the biggest and most popular mobile phone maker that owns and develops Symbian OS. 90% of people never had a Vivaz or Omnia HD in their hands, so they didn't even know that Symbian could be so much faster than on those sluggish Nokias.

3) Also, as long as it was Nokia who kept selling some 90% of Symbian devices, developers had no incentive to develop any software for much faster but very rare devices with powerful GPUs like the Vivaz, Satio or Omnia HD (whose combined sales were just a few percent of all Symbian devices), so - as I wrote - they kept using Nokia's underpowered ARM11 Freescale GPU-less CPUs as the lowest common denominator that their software should run well on. Due to this, those powerful devices like the Omnia HD, Satio or Vivaz never got *ANY* applications which would utilize their much more powerful hardware (including their fast OpenGL-ES enabled GPUs). Only Nokia could change that trend by also releasing multiple powerful Symbian models and making it a new hardware standard to develop for, but they never did it, so powerful multimedia software or 3D games never came. Millions of kids dumped Symbian in 2008-2010 and went to play 3D games on Android or iOS - that was the first wave that gave Android ~40% and iOS ~20% marketshare by 2011.

So, once again, to recap: it was first of all Nokia's stubborn MISERLINESS (using heavily underpowered hardware until almost the very end) what made millions of people consider Symbian as slow and unattractive and what eventually attracted them to competing platforms. Other Symbian manufacturers eventually woke up but their markeshares were way too small anyway to change the general reception of Symbian while Nokia (commonly recognized as THE maker of Symbian and selling 90% of Symbian devices) kept making underpowered Symbian phones until almost 2011. For the same reason, Symbian never got any advanced applications taking advantage of powerful CPUs such as on the Vivaz, as it wasn't profitable for developers to develop any separate apps/versions for just a FEW powerful models with microscopic marketshare, while hundreds of millions of Symbian devices from Nokia continued to have primitive and slow 434 MHz GPU-less CPUs and couldn't run such apps.

Quote:

1. The cancellation of Hildon/Series 90

Note that they DID release the 7710, so they must have originally wanted to support that platform. But in 2005 they gave the 7710 such a PITIFUL 150 MHz ARM9 GPU-less CPU (slower than what the P800 had in 2002) which struggled to handle graphics even on S60's tiny 176x208 displays, so how could it impress anyone with any decent performance on S90's 640x320 one (5.5 times bigger resolution that the CPU itself had to handle due to no GPU)? The S90 UI was fantastic, but on the 7710 it was like a SNAIL, which simply ruined the overall impression. No one liked to watch how the UI redraws in slow motion or how each character you write with handwriting recognition appears on the screen one second after you wrote it.

So it was yet another example of how their idiotically underpowered hardware murdered their superb software.

As for everything else, I fully agree.
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PostPosted: Friday, 01.Sep.2017 11:01    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

I think there are a couple of reasons for the bad strategies of Nokia and Sony Ericsson and they are similar to what happens to Apple nowadays (look at the iPhone "progress"):

Hype and brand equity causing short-term decisions

Nokia was such a strong brand that people praised their devices regardless of performance (in a way similar to what happened to Apple with the iPhone). They were in the same position (hype/reputation) as Apple reached, which caused a lot of blindness and a strict focus on "what sell" - thus leading to the disastrous decisions to cancel Hildon and other platforms.

It seems like their management were obsessed with "what sell" - Series 60 keypad devices and they aimed for short-term profits rather than listening to the technicians who developed Series 90/Hildon. All hardware decisions were clearly aimed at maximizing profitability and it worked for a couple of years due to the Nokia brand being strong.

Don't forget that people defended Nokia with the same energy (and similar arguments) as they do with Apple today.

Sony Ericsson fell victim to the same flawed ideas: Their K/W series were extremely hyped (the reviews of the K700i and K750i etc were absolutely raving) so resources were directed to "what is selling" - feature phones in their case. The constantly glaring reviews and general praise led to a serious miscalculation and misjudgment. The P-series were treated as some kind of "niche" rather than as the natural progression (hence their complete disinterest in making a P950K Cybershot - i.e. a fast, powerful P-series with a K800i camera for example).

I would say their situation was even worse than Nokia since the latter did transition to smartphones despite their underdimensioned hardware, while SEMC just kept releasing K/W series feature phones until they started to panic in 2008, when the K850i didn't get the same raves as the K800i. They suddenly woke up with smartphones but just after killing off UIQ but their strategy was still pretty confused since they suddenly "supported" Android, Series 60 and Windows Mobile - after killing UIQ.

The major problem behind all of this is the theory about profitability and short-term decision making rather than pointing out future development and release products of "tomorrow".

We can see the same pattern with Apple: A lot of hype and EVERYTHING being praised - just look at the progression of the iPhone - which is slow. Go and look at their iOS changelogs and it will become evident that most things are app updates (which are called OS updates since Apple did integrate their Apple Apps into the system rather than having them updated separately).

They are just slowing down and the iPhone is as much a "short-term revenue" generator as the Nokia and SEMC products were back in the days. I.e. no innovation, they are stagnant.

Hype is really dangerous in the longer term. A company with hyped products tend to make decisions based on the "current" trend - i.e. if their products are constantly claimed to be "the best" in their current configuration, the next ones tend to be more of the same. Apple is an excellent example in 2017, Nokia and Sony Ericsson did the same thing. As long as the press praised them, their products weren't changing since it turned out that they "could get away" with slow hardware.

They would have made different devices *if* this hype hadn't been present.

Apple is going to end the same way since they are very complacent with the iPhone due to the hype. Immediately when a new competitor appear (and the hype shifts over), they will end up in the always ironic situation where they are the "media darling" first and then suddenly receive bashing (like when the K800i and K810i were praised as wonderful phones, but the K850i started to receive bad press).

I would say the player who did things right here was Google - Android got a lot of things right with its features, flexibility and the hardware on offer. When Nokia/SEMC kept releasing devices with pitiful hardware, Google and HTC launched fast and powerful 1 GHz Snapdragons. When Nokia released devices that couldn't multitask properly (N97....), Google and HTC provided enough RAM for decent operation and so on.

So Google aimed at the weaknesses of Nokia/SEMC and improved on them, which turned out to be a success. Another major thing were the WM roots of most Android OEMs - i.e. they were used to powerful hardware.
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PostPosted: Friday, 01.Sep.2017 15:05    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

I must also add another pretty amusing thing with Sony Ericsson:

While their smartphones were stuck on 208 MHz Philips Nexperia without GPS and HSDPA - they released... feature phones based on Enea OSE with those things. Look at the C905 - their "N95 competitor" which was pretty decent hardware wise but completely crippled due to that OS. They also made the Aino, a very bizarre OSE based touchscreen device.

And people actually defended those products.

The same goes for the P1i - I still remember users defending the "strategic" decision NOT to offer GPS and so on in their "flagship smartphone" and others repeating like broken records that "smartphones are just niche devices, the key market is feature phones so SEMC should concentrate on 'what is selling' rather than spending money on smartphone development". Amusing users, disastrous strategies...

The downfall of a smartphone OEM seems to follow the same pattern every time:

1. Introduce a product that receive HYPE and absolutely glaring reviews.
2. Make slight iterations of that basic formula - followed by more hype and glaring reviews.
3. Concentrate all efforts on "what is selling" - i.e. everything must be targeting the "best selling" product.
4. Follow the market rather than innovate (i.e. "if the market want 5 inches, then make 5 inches" rather than thinking outside the box.
5. Always listen to journalists and "experts" - i.e. make products praised by them (i.e. don't try to innovate - just follow them - the K750i was hyped in 2005 - ergo: make iterations of it for the next few years).
6. If technicians develop innovative products, turn their projects down and refer to "the market demand our standard product and your experimental thing isn't what they want" (i.e. innovation isn't good because the results can't be predicted due to them being outside the comfort zone).
7. If you feel "pushed" to launch a product that you "don't believe in" - make it unattractive (lack of promotion/support, underpowered hardware, annoying design solutions etc) in order to use it as a whip later on: "Look, we did offer 'Concept X' but it didn't sell so there's no reason for us to make such products". A recent example of this is the Sony Xperia Z Ultra and annoying people defending the lack of a successor.
8. Profit maximization is the most important aspect of product design - especially when the brand is strong. Leverage it to its maximum extent (i.e. save on everything that can be saved on such as CPU power - some people will defend even such a CPU as a Snapdragon 210 when it runs their beloved platform etc). Especially "invisible" parts like RAM and storage can be lowered, especially if the system is restricted to "camouflage" it (such as multitasking restrictions and apps being kicked out early etc).

I think this is happening over and over - Nokia, Sony Ericsson and Apple etc. Same strategies. The current situation looks like this:

Chinese devices: Powerful hardware, a lot of internal storage (128-256GB), fast CPU and everything. Batteries of 4000 mAh and bigger. Attractive pricing/direct distribution.

Western devices: (the term refer to products sold in Europe and North America): Limited RAM and storage (3-4GB, 32-64GB vs 4-8GB and 128-256GB), small batteries (2700-3500 mAh) and extreme pricing (carrier related in order to get people to sign contracts due to them backing off the unlocked path with $1000+ price tags).

The leaders of "offering less for more dollars" are Apple and Samsung even if the latter can be defended as having way more powerful devices than Nokia had (due to them using the latest CPUs rather than humming along with a Snapdragon 805 in 2017 - Old Nokia Style).

There are also downright atrocious "Western" devices with 2011-2012 level of hardware, while a Xiaomi Redmi series for a similar MSRP provide pretty modern stuff. I.e. the good old Nokia strategy again but in a lower segment just in order to avoid "internal competition". I.e. a device with a Snapdragon 625, 4GB RAM, 32GB storage and a 1080p screen running a slimmed down system can be extremely smooth - thus taking market away from the flagship. I.e. it "must" be degraded in order to avoid such a situation.

Chinese brands doesn't have similar limitations in their strategic thinking, i.e. there's no need for Xiaomi to make a terrible Redmi in order to facilitate "increased sales" for the Mi6.

Sony is another example of repeating the same mistakes as before: They launched the Xperia Z Ultra in 2013 - an excellent phablet BUT with an atrocious camera without flash just in order to avoid competing with the Z1 arriving a bit later. Result: Less Ultras sold.

I bought the Ultra in 2013 (literally hanging on the door to the store) because of the complete package and did use it for three years (even buying a second one) but they didn't think analytically and the only thing they "managed" to do was as pathetic as when the P990i eventually became the G700/900: They reduced the screen size, "upgraded" to a MediaTek CPU offering... Snapdragon 800 level of performance (i.e. no reason to replace the Ultra) but put a better camera in. The RAM increased by 1GB. The storage went from 16GB to 32GB.

Meanwhile: Xiaomi introduced the Max. Same excellent display size and quality as the Ultra but serious upgrades where it matters the most (powerful CPU with low power consumption, 4850 mAh up from 3000 mAh in the Ultra, storage up from 16GB to 128GB etc).

So where Sony failed, Xiaomi succeeded.

I think we are seeing the same thing happening again even if it is rather "Chinese vs Western" devices today than "Nokia/Sony Ericsson/Symbian vs Android".

Some people are still trying to play the "Chinese devices are inferior" card (they are stuck in 2002 - when there were such things as Nokla and Sang Ericsson), pretty much the same way as some of them defended the P1i and tried to claim its "superiority" over the E90. I still remember when I made the comment "The P1i has the best accelerator ever - the green 'laundry ball' of Sony Ericsson!" to some of them (i.e. the P1i is a 'better device' because.... it's SEMC).

I think it is time for different device OEMs to get rid of the conservative "Western" thinking (i.e. focusing on short-term) in favor of long-term innovation - including keeping special product lines for development. It is necessary with a new Communicator - i.e. a smartphone that push the boundaries of technology and also provide a platform to test out new ideas and solutions that are down-migrated to the rest of the products.

I already did the migration to a Chinese device and feel pretty reluctant to try another "Western" product unless they improve (i.e. avoid the anti-intellectual muddy waters with a thick haze of idiocy and hype surrounding things like the Galaxy S series etc). My Xiaomi did impress me to such an extent that I am open to a Xiaomi MiBook, MiTV and so on.

What's missing from my current Max is a keyboard flip cover and optimized stylus support. I would also say that a Series 80/Hildon styled UI with pull-down menus would be very much preferred as well.

If the "Western" brands continue to make "fashion toys" and the Chinese ones provide big screen, productivity centric devices with big (4000+ mAh) batteries (i.e. not the dumb theory that you don't need range due to an abundance of power outlets and battery packs) I think it is time for the latter to take the whole market.Wink

It is the same with the obsession of thin designs: I take a 1 cm "thick" device every day with a better camera sensor and optics including a big battery over "credit card thin". I would even say that 1.5 cm is perfectly fine.

It is also amusing to see all those people trying to use the "but the Chinese devices with big batteries aren't 'optimized' - my Western thing with a small 2700 mAh battery is sooo looong laaasting!" - Excuses after excuses. Like back in the days (i.e. multitasking isn't necessary and video recording is pretty useless - iPhone 2G)...

It is possible to get an Android device down to 0.1% per hour in standby and the SOT (Screen-On-Time) can be extended a lot by taking proper action. So the idea that "2700 mAh" equals 4800-5300 mAh is downright silly.

My record in Android device standby is 368 hours on the Xperia Z Ultra (3000 mAh). I simply had one in for flashing and decided to check how long it could last. 368 hours after unplugging I eventually plugged it in (I think I had around 4% left when I plugged it in).

One thing is very evident and it is that a lot of smartphones are smarter than their users. The problem arise when the latter are making excuses on behalf of the manufacturers and try to turn weaknesses and design flaws into "benefits". Or the idea that everything can be solved through "optimization". I.e. it doesn't matter how lousy the hardware is as long as the system is "optimized".

I think optimization is good but NOT the Apple way (removing features and limiting background processes isn't optimization - it is restriction) or Jolla way (they must have been educated by Nokia when the Intex Aqua Fish were created even if I got a ruler on my fingers in a debate when I pointed out that the CPU is a disaster - some Jolla fans insisted that the device is "fast" despite it using the slowest Snapdragon on offer - a CPU without 1080p support).

It's like the Amiga OS: The system is extremely efficient indeed BUT I would say that even if it runs well on a 40/80 MHz 68040 - it runs even better on a lot more powerful hardware, which in turn enable more complex things to be done (1080p video editing won't work properly on that 68040 regardless of how 'smooth' the system itself are).

Nokia did try the "brand and OS optimization substitute for powerful hardware" and even if Series 80 ran well on the 9300i - there were situations where it didn't fixed things (such as playing back 640 x 200 video files due to the CPU being too slow).

The same applies to the current "Western" device status: 64GB for $1000!? It doesn't cut it - I have 128GB internal and 2GB free and a 200GB microSDXC card with 1GB free. The new 400GB card is excellent news. I don't think I will be "content" with the device storage until it reaches around 1TB or so. Even better would be 5TB so I can have my full media library in my pocket.

The latest game in town (for naive users) are camera drivers. I.e. "sensor not important, only camera software is important!" - there are people who insist that it is "worth" to pay $500 more for a device with the same Sony IMX-something sensor due to the.... software. Bad news for their thesis: The Google Camera with HDR+ is now ported. So several devices including my own Max are now enjoying "better pictures".

So the "Samsung/Google Pixel advantage" (i.e. buying standard sensors and then make it up through post-processing) is now eliminated (I never considered a camera application/driver to be worth $500 since my experience is that such a thing can be ported to other devices). Thanks, XDA!

People are not particularly intelligent and get smartphones "optimized" for that particular fact - everything from Nokia underpowered hardware via iPhone restrictions to small non-replaceable batteries in thin devices stem from this basic problem.

I wouldn't be surprised if a manufacturer would be able to sell a device with a 1000 mAh in the Western world by making the statement that "the abundance of charging possibilities are such that 2 hours of SOT and 30 hours of standby is perfectly good and make the device way lighter and tinner". People are that dumb and would probably buy it, especially if it is 2 mm thin or something.

Of course bashing those who get going by 4000+ mAh since it looks "primitive" to "be impressed by the numbers" (Western argument 1A when underpowered and under-dimensioned hardware are to be defended).

It is like the argument I did encounter about pain in the arms caused by... the 10 grams difference between a Xiaomi Mi Max and a Max 2. I did use the Ultra (212 grams) without any problems but I must be incredibly strong (think about the weight... 10 GRAMS). The E90 (210 grams) never caused any issues either.

Let's just hope that there will be a smartphone OEM with a recognition that some users have a working brain - thus leading to the creation of a smartphone/phablet with strong productivity focus (like the Communicator) that provide everything BUT "fashion". Despite the current status I would say that such a device (or even a lineup with 2-3 devices) would sell pretty well even if it won't be mainstream.
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PostPosted: Friday, 01.Sep.2017 15:35    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Regarding Hildon.

My closest contact with it was the 9300i but I studied the 7700/7710 closely and just by looking at the screenshots posted in your review I can say that it was vastly superior to the iOS already in 2004 and I must still admit that I prefer the original (7700/7710 Series 90) look and feel over the even the latest iOS iterations.

What I like with it is its computer styled operation, pull-down menus, appropriate finger-friendliness (such as the buttons in the music player and video player) together with efficient use of the screen estate including dual-column view.

The newer iterations (Maemo OS 2008 on the N810) is also a great development of the basic UI concept. It is elegant, logical AND it doesn't look like a toy (my biggest problem with iOS is the way it looks, every time I use an iPhone I feel like it is a "My First Smartphone" type of product meant for kids).

Despite the 150 MHz CPU on the 7710 I still prefer the original Series 90 UI and operation. Another important aspect here is that it provided a full feature set rather than countless restrictions.

I just don't believe in the idea of making systems "idiot proof" (unless we are talking about certain aspects of aircraft control system design where some disasters happen when the pilot attempt to override the system - i.e. conflicting inputs). Proper design is logical and reliable, i.e. features operate in a natural way that can be grasped by normal brain processes.

The Apple way, i.e. eliminating control over the system is problematic - especially from a market perspective (i.e. proprietary vendor lock-in).

The "Apple thinking" (i.e. ceding control to an automated system/the corporation) can be seen in some disastrous events - especially when flying highly automated aircrafts and when there's a failure - complete 'lockdown' of the brain occur (i.e. the aircraft is flown in an inappropriate way simply because the control is automatic (normally) and now when it is manual - there's no idea of what to do). The same occur when some of those iOS proponents try to use a different device - they just can't figure out the most basic operations and blame the system (it's never their own limitations that act up, it's always the fault of the other system).

Series 90 is probably "too complicated" for the common iPhone user (it says a lot more about them than the Hildon UI itself) but is nevertheless an excellent design and I must say that the 9300i with the related S80v2 was excellent to work with from a UI perspective. Logical and efficient.

It is also interesting that those people complaining about Symbian didn't understand the difference between hardware and software. I assume their brains are in such a failed state that they would argue about "extremely slow acceleration" when they are trying to drive with the parking brake set.

It looks like the "iGeneration" start to do things "differently" (such as allowing automated systems to put them on a dangerous path with action taken literally within seconds from the accident - i.e. when it is beyond a shadow of a doubt that disaster is happening).
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PostPosted: Saturday, 02.Sep.2017 17:28    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

Nokia was such a strong brand that people praised their devices regardless of performance

Maybe initially so. But the UTTER failure of NGage, 7710, N97, and so on, clearly showed them each time that people were NOT willing to buy anything only because it had "Nokia" written on it, especially when they already had alternative choices. Those failures listed above didn't happen at once, they were spread accross several years, so they had a lot of time to analyze and react. They never did.

Since 2008 they were clearly seeing Android's and iPhone's rising marketshares (and it was obvious that those buying Androids and iPhones were former Nokia users, as before 2008 actually almost everyone was a Nokia user) so they knew that millions of people were abandoning them, yet - as described earlier - they did not do absolutely anything in the hardware department. They added Qt to Symbian (which was the right decision that gave new life and completely new possibilities to Symbian) but even though they knew that it meant an addition of HUGE middleware with tons of additional APIs to handle they did NOT upgrade their hardware sufficiently to address it, so everything became even slower.

Symbian with natively integrated Qt actually started working acceptably smoothly only on 2012 models like the 808 PV which had 1+ GHz processors with decent GPUs, but even there it still suffered from just 512 MB RAM and screamed for 1 GB.

The first TRULY 100% smooth Qt experience was the BlackBerry Z10 with its 1.5 GHz dual-core Krait and 2 GB of RAM, so how could it have delivered any acceptable experience on a single-core 680 MHz CPU and 256 MB of RAM? It was plainly undoable. The Nokia N9's 1 GHz single-core TI OMAP 3630 (with GPU) and 1 GB of RAM was an ABSOLUTE MINUMUM to make a Qt-based system an enjoyable experience, but even there things stuttered from time to time.

The day Nokia added Qt to Symbian they should have instantly at least DOUBLED both CPU clock and RAM size, or else they made things even worse.

I did "defend" Nokia, too. But I defended their great OS, not their inferior hardware. I had every single Symbian phone model for review but I only reviewed selected ones, as I didn't wan't to totally criticize all those totally cr*ppy ones.

Quote:

Regarding Hildon. My closest contact with it was the 9300i

Well, it had Hildon APIs but with S80 UI on top of them, so it actually wasn't exposing anything Hildon-related to the user. The most important advantage of Hildon was its great touch UI which only showed up on the 7710, but - as I wrote - its 150 MHz CPU from AD 2001 killed it.

Quote:

Despite the 150 MHz CPU on the 7710 I still prefer the original Series 90 UI and operation.

I never said a single bad word about S90 UI. It was just great. But just DEADLY slow on a 150 MHz CPU and a few MB of free RAM (and with no virtual memory that Symbian 7 didn't support yet). It was solely the cr*ppy hardware to blame for it, not the OS or the UI.... Hildon UI somehow worked OK only on the N900 and its 600 MHz TI OMAP (but it still wasn't a speed champion), so just imagine how it must have worked on a 150 MHz ARM9, i.e. some 5 times slower. It's not difficult to imagine how deadly slow it was just by comparing the numbers....
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PostPosted: Saturday, 02.Sep.2017 22:18    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

I fully agree with all idiotic hardware decisions made by Nokia. I think the N97 is the number one here but the way they made the 7700/7710 is also downright amusing, especially when there were PocketPCs/Windows Mobile devices available with way more powerful hardware at the same time.

It is also pretty evident that the Nokia management seems to have been content with the sales of S60 keypad devices so I guess they didn't learn anything since they were in a comfort zone for a long time and considered the "Nokia" brand strong enough - we can see it very clearly with the whole idea that such a failure as WP7 would be "successful" if that brand were utilized...

I think their whole history (in the 2000s) demonstrated a couple of ideologies, which we are still seeing today:

1. The brand is a substitution for powerful hardware (i.e. it is possible to be lenient on this part as long as people are buying the products for the brand alone - just look at Apple and Samsung today and compare with Chinese brands... the same thing is happening).
2. Slow CPUs, abysmal amounts of RAM, low storage capacity can be "compensated" by "OS optimization" together with the brand.
3. Western buyers tend to stay with a "strong brand" out of emotional reasons (soft factors) for a long time and accept a lot of "abuse" before they start to consider competitors (unless the latter are getting a lot of media hype due to a strong brand).
4. People tend to praise pretty lackluster devices out of brand loyalty and it can create a situation where the OEM keep making bad decisions simply because it "works" (i.e. their products sell in their present configuration).
5. Unwillingness to change - i.e. the management are happy with Status Quo as long as their sales are "sufficient" (i.e. if a product are selling well despite design issues - change aren't coming easily since it require investment).
6. If a redesign would decrease the margins (i.e. more expensive hardware etc) - change will be harder to push.

It seems like Nokia simply considered themselves superior and we can see it to the very end (i.e. "Nokia's cash position remains strong").

I think the Hildon/Series 90 platform would have been relatively smooth on something along the lines of 300 MHz or so (I think it was the fastest mobile level in 2004 if I remember correctly). It is also pretty obvious that the system was perhaps a bit "too ahead" of its time vs hardware in 2003/2004 - i.e. that it would be necessary to get up to E90/N95 or N810 level of hardware (or faster) before a Hildon device (I am talking about a Symbian 9.x based "Hildon 3.0" now) would start to run pretty well using a 640x480 or 800x480 display but with MINIMUM 128MB or even better with 256MB RAM.

One thing is for sure: The iPhone 2G would have been an even bigger toy if a 330-412 MHz Hildon device had existed running a Symbian 9.x based system (I assume the N810 hadn't existed in such a scenario since the platform would have been based on Symbian).

A "proper" development path of Hildon would have been like:

2003: Nokia introduce the MX as the "Nokia 7700" and the CX become the "9500". Series 90v1 is now out and about. CPUs around 200 MHz or so.

2004: The 7710 replace the 7700 and the CPU is bumped to around 300 MHz. An updated "9500i" Communicator is launched with the same CPU.

2005: Hildon 2.0 (Series 90v2) arrive based on Symbian 8 and the 7710 and 9500i are replaced by 7720 and 9600 followed by an N-series device, N100 (positioned above the N90).

2006: Hildon 3.0 (Series 90v3) based on Symbian 9 arrive but the whole Symbian Signed are made differently and the apps remain backward compatible even if some of them require rework. More N-series with the platform arrives and a new E-series Communicator are launched (E9600i).

2007: Hildon 3.1 arrive with a brand new Communicator together with a very powerful multimedia device in the N-series, while the first "numbered" midrange products with the platform land.

2008. Hildon 3.2 land and Nokia start to implement Qt into the system. The whole N-series are now based on the platform, while Series 60 are used in lower end devices. The Communicator range are updated further.

2009. Hildon 3.3 on 1 GHz Snapdragon 8250 hit the market and new apps are Qt based. The new CPU are used in the new Communicator and a very highend N-series device. Sliding keyboard models are now added to the lineup (i.e. N900 style).

2010. Hildon 4.0 (Series 90v4) with the UI made in Qt land.

2011. The first dual-core Hildon devices arrive. The system are optimized for Snapdragons and new Nokia devices are generally based on them.

I think the history would have been something like that if Nokia had treated the platform seriously. Perhaps Apple had tried to make an iPhone anyway but its success would be very limited... Android could have emerged but if the Hildon platform had been licensed, things could have been very different there as well - especially if Symbian Inc managed the system and an app store for it - thus avoiding the situation where Nokia made hardware in direct competition with other Symbian partners while also controlling the system.

One thing I am still mighty upset with is that the Communicator range were eliminated since I still consider it the best smartphone concept ever made.

Despite all mistakes by Nokia I must say that I consider the entry of Apple into this particular market to be pretty disastrous since it turned the whole development backwards - i.e. from powerful sophisticated platforms to seriously dumbed down ones.

It is a sorry state when such a basic thing as a stylus and HWR are now mostly narrowed down to just ONE smartphone model (this is if you want it to be integrated with the device and some optimization of the UI for it).

Even more annoying is the simple fact that modern hardware would be able to provide perfect HWR - i.e. no need for any change of writing style - just write as on paper and the device learn properly the individual style. It would also facilitate more efficient UIs, especially on keyboard devices.

So I wouldn't consider Apple to be a particularly "positive" influence on smartphone design.

It also made Microsoft wasting all those years on dumping Windows Mobile in favor of such a trashy thing as Windows Phone. EIGHT YEARS in the bin here! Just because of that dumb Apple device and even dumber users with their "arguments"; especially those about "how hard" it was to use Symbian etc.

I would also say that it was that dumb iPhone, which made Nokia make such a HUGE regression and downright pathetic device as the Lumia 800 (even the first 9000 Communicator was way more useful I would say).

Perhaps the best solution for the overpopulation on this planet is to manufacture the SEMC P1i again and let all those "air heads" get down and dirty with a STYLUS and a KEYBOARD at the same time. Plus a RESISTIVE display! I would be a bit kind and put more powerful hardware in and increase the resolution to 640 x 480 but it would be amusing to see them "in action".

One of my more "memorable" iPhone encounters was a 3G S toy with a cracked display. Pretty fascinating and what a relief to return to my HTC TP2 at the time....
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PostPosted: Tuesday, 12.Sep.2017 18:35    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

I think the N97 is the number one here but the way they made the 7700/7710 is also downright amusing

They had a totally incomprehensible approach to hardware. For example, in their E-series (business) phones they were using much more powerful CPUs than in multimedia devices. Which didn't make absolutely ANY sense.

For example, the E72 had a 600 MHz CPU whereas the 5800 XpressMusic had 434 MHz one. So the 5800, which was meant to compete with the iPhone and had a higher resolution touch screen and S60 5th Edition and was aimed at multimedia consumers (to watch movies, listen to music, play games) had a 30% slower CPU than a device aimed at business user (i.e. mostly to make calls and read emails) with tiny low res screen (320x240 or so) and S60 3rd Edition.

Which shows that they did have both the hardware and Symbian drivers for it, it's just that they were stubbornly underpowering all popular devices and putting more powerful solutions into what absolutely didn't need it.

Amazing, isn't it?

As for the iPhone, I do have an iPhone 5 at home at the moment. My wife sister's husband dropped it onto concrete and it doesn't charge so they were going to throw it away, whereas it only takes replacing the battery, so it took it. I played with it and I wouldn't ever trade my Passport for the iPhone. Its UI is illogical for me (I especially hate how the "Back" button is at the top of the display and there's no simple wipe gesture to go back), it's generally slower than the Passport, the way BB10 multitasks is just incomparably better, and so on. A nice looking toy for the masses, that's what it is, whereas the Passport is a true workhorse.
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PostPosted: Wednesday, 13.Sep.2017 10:54    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Regarding the iPhone:

The world just got the 10th Wonder with the iPhone X and the good old hype is already starting and the amusing arguments are already there:

"Apple has better swipes!"
"Facial recognition finally done right!"

Then the classic: "If I have to look it up, it doesn't count" (i.e. when the argument about the gestures are met with a reference to BB10.x and Harmattan - they doesn't "count" because the ignorant user "have to look them up because they didn't hear about them".

Its like Hintry again and again.

My major issue with the iPhone is not really the device itself but its FOLLOWERS. Those followers are what really make me anti-iPhone because the arguments are either pure ignorance, stupidity or both. Ten years later - the arguments used for promoting its "superiority" is as bad as in 2007.

It is the same thing with "ordinary people didn't hear about the Xiaomi Mi Mix so the iPhone X is their first encounter with bezel-less design". Rolling Eyes

I wouldn't trade any device (Android, BB, Symbian, Windows Mobile 6.x, Jolla) for an iPhone - not only because of the restrictions (which are still there - it is pitiful that such a simple thing as USB-OTG doesn't work on a shiny new iPhone 8/Plus/X...) but also the followers. They leave such a bad taste in my mouth with their constant attempts to send this silly thing up on a piedestal.

One follower even started to argue that iOS is "better for multitasking" and it is such a nonsensical statement that no comments are really needed.

If there were intelligent arguments for the iOS I would be more relaxed in my attitude towards it but every time someone attempt to defend it and declare it "better" - it is always with ignorance, stupidity or a combination of the two as their main arguments.
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PostPosted: Wednesday, 13.Sep.2017 14:55    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

The most amazing thing Nokia did (beside killing all platforms) was the N97. The 5800 XpressMusic felt very mid-range when it arrived but the N97 is were things really hit the fan.

It is as pathetic as Sony nowadays with their "Ultra" series (the inability to provide a decent phablet even if they had one in 2013).

I still remember the N97 like yesterday: A device launched way later than the E90, providing worse screen resolution and quality than the E90, a way slower CPU than the E90, completely insufficient RAM (where the E90 had plenty for its time and was a multitasking champion), a GPS with serious reception issues, a camera lens cover that scratched the lens, unstable firmware and frequent crashes and out-of-memory issues.

My memory tells me that the 5800 didn't fail as miserably, mostly because it ran a "lighter" system implementation and that it didn't have those technical problems.

I would say that the worst devices made by Nokia if we summarize them is the N97 and I would also say the Lumia series, especially the 800 made by Compal. The N97 was bad but the Lumia 800 was like a toy even compared to a 7650 or 3650 running Series 60v1.

Their choice of CPU was amusing in several cases, I think the 5630 XpressMusic was first with the 600 MHz one... But the N97 is like a class of its own.

I still remember that I immediately dismissed the N97 when I realized three things just by looking at the spec sheet: Worse display than the E90, slower CPU than the E90 and serious RAM issues (which I had enough of on the P990i were I had to do constant raids with SwissManager Pro to reclaim memory).

Some people try to argue about "experience" but it is pretty self-explanatory that lower resolution, slower CPU and less free RAM just can't be "compensated" by software. It is like Android devices were some users attempt similar argumentation today.

A typical example is Sony and their "Ultra" line - releasing a new device THREE YEARS after the original Ultra with a MediaTek CPU offering SIMILAR performance as a Snapdragon 800 is a DISASTER regardless of how hard some people try to make the "it's a midrange device!" argument and point.

So they expect me to replace my 2013 "vintage" Ultra with a "new" device offering... similar performance? 1GB extra RAM is also making me yawn - it isn't anything to brag about at the time (the Z3TC had 3GB in 2014).

Nokia did it with the N97 and Sony did it with the XA Ultra.

And now BlackBerry is doing it by dropping the Priv without offering a similar positioned flagship while destroying everything by not providing updates.

My new go-to brand is Xiaomi and it seems like I will stay there for a while. They do most things right even if I would like to whip them a bit for making the new Mix 2 smaller than the Mix 1.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 02:29    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

Regarding the iPhone:
The world just got the 10th Wonder

Where's the 9th? Missing in action? Aborted?

Anyway, check out how its "revolutionary brand new gesture based UI" closely resembles that of BB10. When I watched the iPhone X demonstration I couldn't resist a feeling that they were demoing.... the BB Z10 from 2012.

And in their iPhone X press releases they also said that they've just INVENTED wireless charging and 'tap to wake' (that the Nokia N9 had in 2011).

Amusing. But guess what.... millions of idiots will buy that sh*t.

Anyway, the most funny quotes from Apple's iPhone X presentation are as follows:

- "so intelligent it can respond to a tap, your voice" - amazing, isn't it?
- "display employs new techniques and technology to precisely follow the curves of the design" - cosmic technology, no doubt. I start missing my N9 that had a curved display in 2011.
- "The first OLED screen that rises to the standards of iPhone" - can't find words to comment on this one
- "The most durable glass ever" - I've read the same in all previous press releases since 2G up to 7s
- "Familiar gestures make navigation natural and intuitive" - at least this time they're true. Those gestures are indeed FAMILIAR - I know them well from my BB10 phones.
- "Instead of pressing a button, a single swipe takes you home from anywhere" - Hello Nokia N9, hello BB10, hello Jolla. Have you received your patent fees yet?
- "Your face is now your password." - revolution! I've had it on my HP Elitebook 8460p and 8470p laptops from 2011 and 2012.
- "12 Animoji" - holy f*ck.
- "Deeper pixels." - yeah, that's deep.
- "Superhuman intelligence" - that's probably the best one. But I wouldn't exclude that the iPhone is more intelligent than its typical owner. Quite possible.
- "Bionic. Smartest chip ever in a smartphone, with a neural engine" - I've just [put your favorite swearword here] my pants. Bionic, neural, superhuman.... An ounce of Higgs bosons included per core.
- "With no charging cable required, iPhone X is truly designed for the future" - just like the Braun Oral-B toothbrush I bought some 17 years ago.
- "Introducing AirPower mat" - revolution! A charging mat/pad like any other, just with a catchy name and 3x higher price.
- "A groundbreaking iOS for a groundbreaking iPhone" - haven't noticed any seismic activity at the time of its announcement.
- "entirely rethought OS with new gestures" - shamelessly taken from BB10.
- "Pay friends in Messages" - who pays friends?

.... and so on.

The most amusing lecture I've had for years.

I am in no way trying to say that it is a bad device. But the way it is promoted DISGUSTS and actually OFFENDS me to the point that I refuse to ever give them any money for it. And certainly not well above 1000 USD (probably close to 1500 after taxes in my country). I'd need to be SICK IN THE HEAD to ever pay as much for a.... phone, especially one that doesn't even properly multitask.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 13:23    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

The 8th Wonder of the World was the iPhone 2G. The 9th Wonder of the World was the iPhone 4, which gave us the Retina Display and therefore the invention of the high resolution ditto.

I fully agree - the way the iPhone is being promoted with statements like the ones you quoted are very important reasons why I dislike that device and its typical owners. I don't doubt for a second that the iPhone is indeed smarter than the owner since the quality of their arguments are... low. Very low.

Some people get excited with those swipes but I don't get the point - Nokia had the Swipe UI - fully designed for gesture control and I haven't seen any iOS version that are similar in this regard. Same thing with BB10.x.

iOS has a lot of legacy now so it would be complicated to redesign the UI into something fully gesture controlled (i.e. most actions are performed by gestures including two and three finger ones).

It is also evident from the look of it that Apple is still firmly designing toys with big buttons (their recent moves with Mac OS X are such that I am staying on 10.9.5 and will be there until it is time for a new computer - the next one will be something else since it seems like Joe6Pack is the new MacBook customer based on its design and "iPhone-esque OS".

The worst and most annoying part of the whole thing is not the Apple marketing itself BUT the users and "experts" making statements like:

"It doesn't matter that X existed years before, it took Apple to make it useful!"
"It never pays to be first, Apple is the proof!"
"If you have to look something up, it means it wasn't successful and doesn't count!"
"It doesn't matter that X existed years before, no one knew about it!"

I.e: When Apple tell the world about the new wonderful "invention" called "gesture control" - everyone is supposed to sing along rather than mentioning other platforms.

I always avoid products that are marketed (especially by so-called experts) in such an anti-intellectual way as the iDevices. I must admit that Apple and their followers set an all-time low for marketing since I can't think of another product right now being promoted as "being revolutionary" when it incorporates existing technology.

It is also pretty evident that people buying a device based on such arguments are... ignorant (to put it mildly). I would also say that yes, "Marketing is important" etc but buying products blindly because Apple call them "groundbreaking" (so it must be true because Apple would never lie...) isn't an indication of "intelligence" or "rational thought". It's the contrary.

I also realize why I never watch Apple keynotes, I have enough when people immediately start spamming other forums with propaganda.

I would also say that the first gesture controlled UI was the NeoShell on the Neonode N1 so I am afraid that the "revolution" happened in 2002 when they demonstrated the first prototype.

One thing is good, though: Every time I hear someone saying that Apple "invented gesture control" I know that the person is living in a reality distortion field in the same way as if they claim that "Apple invented the smartphone".

Edit: Tap to wake? I have been using it for the last four-five years or so. I even have double tap to sleep. There's also "swipe to wake" on some devices.

But I guess it is as usual: The fact that I have been using the "new feature" for a couple of years "doesn't count" so the "statement about Apple introducing it to the world" is... true because... Apple - the same way as some people grudgingly "accept" that smartphone existed before 2007 but the whole development (11 years if we count from the 9000 Communicator!) are to be "ignored".

There are falsification of history in different ways but this is something new I must say (it is like saying that Ford invented the car, thereby ignoring the period 1886-1915 or that the aircraft was invented by Boeing - thereby ignoring all development before 1917-1918).

It is also interesting that "if I have to look something up... it doesn't count" can ever be an argument. It must be the latest thesis: "If the existence of X is denied, then X doesn't exist and everything can be modified to fit into an appropriate description of the reality - anyone resisting the new picture doesn't understand how things are connected". Or "If a product doesn't sell in 1 billion copies and is plastered on every single billboard - it doesn't exist and can be ignored when making up the new history about who invented X".
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 13:51    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

My own comments on the Apple keynote propaganda:

- "so intelligent it can respond to a tap, your voice" - My Philips SparQ A.D. 1996 had voice dial and I have been using DT2W since 2013 approximately so yes, revolutionary...
- "display employs new techniques and technology to precisely follow the curves of the design" - The edgeless display arrived in 2014 on the Sharp Aquos X and curved displays on the Nokia N9 in 2011 so... yes, revolutionary indeed...
- "The first OLED screen that rises to the standards of iPhone" - All OLED panels manufactured before September 12 2017 are bad - it took Apple to make them good, especially since they are manufactured in-house.... or blessed by Apple at least
- "The most durable glass ever" - Apple - the Glass Maker...
- "Familiar gestures make navigation natural and intuitive" - Just like the Neonode N1 and Nokia N9 (not to mention Android)...
- "Instead of pressing a button, a single swipe takes you home from anywhere" - Just like the Nokia N9 and several other devices...
- "Your face is now your password." - Google launched facial recognition with Android ICS in 2011...
- "12 Animoji" - Says everything about the target audience (as clear of a statement as iFart back in the days)
- "Deeper pixels." - Says everything about the target audience again (what a sales pitch: "It has deeper pixels!")
- "Superhuman intelligence" - It is more intelligent than the owner but not as intelligent as Apple themselves
- "Bionic. Smartest chip ever in a smartphone, with a neural engine" - There was a Droid Bionic in 2011 and I remain unconvinced that Apple beats everything in CPU design - their processor is smarter than the regular iPhone buyer and owner, though...
- "With no charging cable required, iPhone X is truly designed for the future" - Groundbreaking when inductive charging has been around on devices since 2011 or so....
- "Introducing AirPower mat" - Let us introduce inductive charging as a new Apple technology and use a fancy name so people don't think it is the same thing...
- "A groundbreaking iOS for a groundbreaking iPhone" - iOS is indeed groundbreaking: "The most advanced mobile OS" without support for such a basic thing as USB-OTG and you can't even install Kodi on it unless you jailbreak or follow a long guide involving a computer - the only "advanced" thing about the system is its restrictions....
- "entirely rethought OS with new gestures" - It looks like iOS to me, down to the big button icon design and the "new gestures" is rather old gestures.
- "Pay friends in Messages" - Friends are paying new iPhones so their friends can join the movement (it is like a virus, those who are infected want to spread it further...)

I must also say that the iPhone X is an eye-sore, looking like a "Fischer-Price Smartphone" for kids when compared to something like a Xiaomi Mi Mix (especially the first model). I must also admit that such a device as the Galaxy Note 8 looks way better.

It is pretty fascinating that Apple are able to sell a toy-designed device to adults AND make them consider the design to be "mature" (there are iPhone users who seriously claim that their device and iOS look and feel are for a mature audience...).
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 16:22    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

I feel morally obliged to join the "write a comical, yet disappointed response to apple's quotes" bandwagon and make a small contribution.


Quote:

- "12 Animoji" - holy f*ck.


I think that "sh!t" would be the more appropriate word here. If you know what I mean. :]

"Deeper pixels." -- Oooh, a voxel-based UI?! Now we're talking revolut... oh wait.

"so intelligent it can respond to a tap, your voice" -- but... don't all touchscreens work like "you tap the phone and something happens"? Also, even that (Apple's) Siri thing was introduced with the 4S.

"Pay friends in Messages" -- If you're paying them, are they really friends? Makes you think, doesn't it?

"display employs new techniques and technology to precisely follow the curves of the design" -- wtf, I'm so dazzled by the sheer nonsense that I can't even think of anything funny

"The first OLED screen that rises to the standards of iPhone" -- that's a peculiar way of saying "our first screen of the type that everyone else's been using since 201X".

"Superhuman intelligence" -- even the calculator my mom bought in 1987 has "superhuman intelligence", from a certain perspective.

"Bionic. Smartest chip ever in a smartphone, with a neural engine" -- if it thinks similarly to a human, then how can it have superhuman intelligence? Hahaha got ya.

----------------
On a less snarky note, has humanity been evolving for 2 million years so that we could pay $1500 for animated sh!t emojis? Sorry Darwin, we failed you :[
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 17:17    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

If we are to believe iPhone users (such as good old Hintry et al, there were a couple of them spreading propaganda in the forum) - I would say that the human race evolved for one and only one reason only: In order for the iPhone to be created and appreciated.

It is the finest achievement of mankind and all human knowledge, intelligence and logical thinking synthesized into one three-dimensional artifact. The iPhone is the proof of the evolution of species and yes, it can be considered a huge let down for Darwin, the creator and everything related.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 14.Sep.2017 20:47    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

The 8th Wonder of the World was the iPhone 2G. The 9th Wonder of the World was the iPhone 4, which gave us the Retina Display and therefore the invention of the high resolution ditto.

Right. But I keep wondering what's wrong with the "9". No Windows 9, no iPhone 9 and so on. I know that "4" is a doomed digit in Chinese culture but I have never heard of any such superstitions when it comes to "9".

Quote:

Some people get excited with those swipes but I don't get the point

Gestures are really useful and do improve UI control a lot. That's what I love my BB10 phones for, and that's the first thing that I severely disliked when I played with the iPhone 5. Having to tap a Back button at the TOP of the screen (where my thumb doesn't reach so I need to use the other hand) to go back one screen is amazingly inconvenient. On BB10 a simple swipe to the right does it.

So it is actually a GOOD thing that they finally come to iOS, and I don't have any problems with that. What I do mind is promoting them as a "groundshaking invention" while having shamelessly taken them from OSes which have had them since 2011.

It is especially disgusting in case of a company which patents whatever possible (e.g. as silly things as Swipe to Unlock) but at the same time borrows everyone else's inventions and calls them their own.

Quote:

When Apple tell the world about the new wonderful "invention" called "gesture control" - everyone is supposed to sing along rather than mentioning other platforms.

Right. And dishonest, paid journalists instantly rush to strengthen that impression. A number of articles have instantly appeared in all major media explaining people what a great wireless charging feature the iPhone is going to introduce to the world.

Quote:

Edit: Tap to wake? I have been using it for the last four-five years or so. I even have double tap to sleep. There's also "swipe to wake" on some devices.

Double-tap to wake had been present on the Nokia N950 and N9 since 2011-2012. BB10 phones have swipe-up to wake. They also have swipe-down for Bedside / Battery saving mode. So those gestures have been present on the market and used by millions of people for almost 7 years.

Quote:

- "The most durable glass ever" - Apple - the Glass Maker...

There is very little, actually next to nothing, Apple-made in the iPhone when it comes to hardware. I think that the following picture shows it well enough:



Quote:

Also, even that (Apple's) Siri thing was introduced with the 4S.

Siri sucks because it only works online.

Oh, and I really like how Apple supports the freedom of speech. On discussions.apple.com site someone asked why Siri and voice dictation can't work offline, and the response was as follows:

"Paragraph (2) (1) (2) of these terms of use prohibit us from speculating why Apple did or did not take certain actions."

Razz
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