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BentL
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PostPosted: Thursday, 29.Sep.2011 17:21    Post subject: Meltemi   Reply with quote   

Michal may also soon have to create a forum for Meltemi, see Wall Street Journal. Excerpt:
    Nokia Aims Software At Low-End Phones
    Nokia Corp., having abandoned its ambition to develop a high-end operating system, is shifting its programming efforts toward creating software for its low-end phones, according to people familiar with the matter.

    The project is a Linux-based operating system code-named Meltemi, the Greek word for dry summer winds that blow across the Aegean Sea from the north. It is being led by Mary McDowell, the handset maker's executive vice president in charge of mobile phones, these people say.

    A spokesman for Nokia, Doug Dawson, declined to comment on the Finland-based company's future products or technologies.

    Nokia's attempt to build its own software is another sign that the value in the technology industry is shifting from hardware to software. In the past year, Google Inc.'s Android software has dominated the midrange smartphone market while Apple Inc.'s iPhone, which runs Apple's iOS software, has captured the high end.

    Analysts say mobile-handset makers that have their own software, such as Apple, have big advantages. They can better define their products against rivals and aren't dependent on other companies for growth.

    Nokia's efforts mirror those of South Korea's Samsung Electronics Co., which is investing in its own operating system called Bada and making high-end smartphones that run Android, people familiar with the matter say. There is a danger in "being overcommitted to one platform," says Canalys analyst Tim Shepherd, referring to vendors who build smartphones that run Android. "The key, important thing is to spread the risk," he adds.

    The issue for Nokia, says one of the people familiar with the matter, is that even consumers in emerging markets now expect low-end feature phones to act like smartphones. Feature phones offer limited Internet functionality and are used mainly for voice and text communications.

    For Nokia, the low-end mobile-phone business is crucial to its survival. Feature phones accounted for about 47% of the company's device-and-services sales in the second quarter.

    In February, Nokia Chief Executive Stephen Elop pledged to boost the company's low-end phone business by targeting people in emerging markets who don't yet have cellphones. Emerging markets traditionally have been a source of strength for the Finnish company, but its lead in the category has been challenged by low-cost Chinese manufacturers.

    Less-costly smartphones—in part thanks to Android, which Google offers to manufacturers free of charge—also threaten to eclipse the low-end phone market. Feature-phone shipments fell 4% from a year earlier in the second quarter for the first time since 2009, according to market researcher IDC.

    Nokia has a long history in developing its own software. The company started work in 2003 on its own high-end operating system, called Maemo, but the effort faced setbacks inside Nokia due to management changes and shifts in strategy. Nokia initially envisioned the platform for use in tablet computers and electronic devices other than its phones, because the company didn't want to divert focus from its Symbian operating system, according to people familiar with the matter. After Apple launched the iPhone in 2007, Nokia started targeting Maemo for smartphones.

    Then last year, Nokia said it would combine Maemo with software from Intel Corp. to create a next-generation operating system called MeeGo. But in February, Mr. Elop said Nokia would make smartphones using Microsoft Corp. software, effectively ending Nokia's Intel partnership.

    This week Nokia began shipping its N9 smartphone, its last and only MeeGo device. The high-end smartphone features a 3.9-inch touch screen, and unlike Apple's iPhone and other touch-screen smartphones, lacks a home button at the bottom of the device.

    The N9 will be available in 50 markets including Russia, Brazil and China, but currently not the U.S. It will retail for between €480 and €560, or approximately $650 to $760, depending on storage size.

    On Wednesday, Intel announced support for a new operating system, called Tizen, reflecting its decision to reduce its focus on MeeGo, which was hurt when Nokia shifted its support to Microsoft's Windows system earlier this year.

    While Nokia won't be making any more MeeGo devices, there are indications that the touch-screen user interface in the N9 could make its way down to Nokia's feature phones. In announcing the Microsoft deal in February, Nokia said it planned to direct its MeeGo efforts toward next-generation devices and platforms. Meltemi made its first appearance in an internal Nokia memo, uncovered in April by a U.K. technology website, the Register. In the memo, Nokia said employees on the MeeGo teams would have opportunities within the Meltemi effort. And in an internal video that leaked online in June, Mr. Elop cited efforts to bring "full touch activity" to mobile phones and mentioned the Meltemi software effort.

    It is unclear how successful Nokia will be with its new software.To cope with the competitive challenges, Nokia introduced so-called dual-SIM phones that allow users to have two phone numbers, a popular feature in emerging markets. It is also working to close the gap with smartphones by launching feature phones with touch capability and a keypad.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 29.Sep.2011 20:21    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

...as if there was not already enough confusion about the abundance of new operating systems...
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PostPosted: Thursday, 29.Sep.2011 22:37    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Well.... my-tizen.com and my-meltemi.com registered for my hard earned $20... Let's see what time brings...

If the Meltemi turns out to be a simple low end platform to replace S40, then most probably I will not be interested in supporting it here, but since not much is known at the moment it was better to get the domain while it was available...

Interestingly, whois says that Rafe of AAS registered allaboutmeltemi.com already in June.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 29.Sep.2011 23:32    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

well done Michal,
if all elles fails you will have a bag of domain names to sell..
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PostPosted: Friday, 30.Sep.2011 00:31    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

if all elles fails you will have a bag of domain names to sell..

I already have a lot of them even know. The question is, who would now buy My-Maemo, My-MeeGo or My-Symbian, despite of them having decent Google PR and not bad position in search engines, if they're all about dead systems. Probably the only use would be use them as redirections to some porn sites Crying or Very sad

Few years ago, domains like my-symbian or allaboutsymbian were priced at tens of thousands of dollars, now they're worth nothing. Thanks, Nokia!
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PostPosted: Friday, 30.Sep.2011 08:41    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

yeah. What a pitty. But you could also use them as a landing page for some kind of "history of abondend mobile operating systems"-page. Don't know if something like that is of any interest Wink

Or maybe any successor OS will emerge and than you can use them as redirection for another my-* domain
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PostPosted: Friday, 30.Sep.2011 10:08    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Michal Jerz wrote:
Well.... my-tizen.com and my-meltemi.com registered for my hard earned $20... Let's see what time brings...


Nokia would probably call it "Series 45" or "Series 50", if it is to be a replacement for "Series 40".

Of course, they could always call it "Series 40 7th Edition", or something to that effect, too.

Any internal, leaked codenames are not likely to survice as actual product platform names, so I suspect you've wasted your $20 (as has Rafe his).
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PostPosted: Friday, 30.Sep.2011 16:16    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Quote:

Nokia would probably call it "Series 45" or "Series 50", if it is to be a replacement for "Series 40".

Well, that's if they still want to follow that old Sxx pattern and if they want the new platform to be associated with S40. But maybe now they want to use names rather than numbers for their platforms - Symbian is now Anna, Belle and not S60 (nor even Symbian ^3), MeeGo is Harmattan - and maybe they want the platform to be considered a brand new one rather than an upgrade to S40.

Harmattan was also just a code name, but it wasn't dropped - the platform is still referred to as MeeGo Harmattan (probably to distinguish it, as it's actually not "fully" MeeGo, but still). And "Meltemi" seems to follow the same pattern as it is also a name of wind.

But of course no one knows how it will be called, maybe even Nokia hasn't decided yet. So yes, that domain may turn out to be not needed. And also the platform itself may turn out to be completely out of my interest. But it was probably still better to get it while it was available and then see what happens, than wait and have someone else get it.

Quote:

so I suspect you've wasted your $20

Just $10. The other $10 was for my-tizen.com, which is a confirmed name of the project.
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PostPosted: Thursday, 06.Oct.2011 13:45    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Meltemi is a replacement for Nokia's S40 phones, see The Register. Excerpt:
    Meltemi is real – Nokia’s skunkworks Linux
    You can still p-p-p-pick up a Penguin

    Sources tell us that Nokia is developing a Linux-based replacement for its S40 phones, called Meltemi. The news was leaked, accurately, by the Wall Street Journal last week. Now we can confirm it.

    The codename turned up in an internal communication we saw in April, referring to opportunities for redundant Meego staff “in the Meltemi organisation”. We inferred that was a Windows project. It isn’t.

    The thinking is that a Linux-based replacement for S40 will allow developers to tap into proven development tools – and Qt.

    The April memo referred to Meltemi as a platform for “rich Featurephones” and stated that development will be centered in Ulm, Germany.

    Nokia acquired Trolltech with the intention of providing a unified developer platform across Symbian and Linux. By autumn 2010, it had finally licked the fruits of the acquisition into shape (there were competing teams jostling for supremacy) when the company axed its CEO, and his successor plumped for Windows as Nokia’s smartphone platform.

    There’s no U-turn, however. Meltemi had been long-been touted as a richer successor to S40. Windows phones will occupy the budget smartphone segment, not Linux.

    Nokia completed the transition of Symbian staff out to Accenture last week.
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PostPosted: Friday, 09.Mar.2012 15:21    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Nokia is working on Meltemi as a replacement for its S40 phones, see Reuters. Excerpt:
    Nokia maps fightback against cheap Android phones

    • Plans more, cheaper Windows models
    • Working on new feature phone platform - sources

    HELSINKI, March 8 (Reuters) - Finnish group Nokia aims to revamp its feature phone offering this year and add more and cheaper Windows smartphones to fight back against the fast-rising popularity of Google's massmarket Android phones.

    "We are addressing this with our planned introductions in 2012 of smarter, competitively priced feature phones with more modern user experiences," the company said on Thursday in its annual report.

    Though smartphones - such as Apple's iPhone, which provides a platform for third-party application developers - are where the industry's growth is concentrated, feature phones - which have only limited support for third-party software - still account for most units sold.

    Smartphones make up less than a third of industry volume.

    Nokia has also been working on a new Linux-based software platform, code-named Meltemi, to replace its Series 40 software in more advanced feature phones, industry sources told Reuters.

    The Series 40 platform has been used in more cellphones than any other software, reaching a cumulative total of 1.5 billion units a few months ago. Meltemi would enable a more smartphone-like experience on those simpler models.

    Google's free Android platform has stormed the smartphone market in a few years, and last quarter more than 50 percent of all smartphones sold used the software.

    Nokia last year dumped its own smartphone software platforms in favour of Microsoft's Windows Phone, which has so far had a limited impact, in part due to the high prices of phones using it.

    Last month at the Mobile World Congress trade show Nokia unveiled the Lumia 610 model, its cheapest Windows Phone so far, priced at 189 euros ($250), excluding taxes and operator subsidies.

    "We plan to introduce and bring to markets new and more affordable Nokia products with Windows Phone in 2012, such as the Nokia Lumia 610," Nokia said in the report.

    Separately, Nokia forecast 2012 capital spending would rise to around 650 million euros from 597 million in 2011.

    It also said it saw rising price pressure for navigable map data in its navigation business - the former Navteq - which competes against TomTom, due to Google's free turn-by-turn navigation offering.
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PostPosted: Friday, 09.Mar.2012 17:42    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

This is a very interesting news... And I think a good one.

Even if it is just a crippled feature phone platform, I guess it will be more or less based on Harmattan. I guess the core system may be almost the same, only support for 3rd party software may be restricted to QML/HTML5 or so. Maybe also the screen resolution will be lower. So in some degree it will keep Harmattan alive. If Nokia one day understand that Windows Phone won't bring them anywhere (which I believe won't take long), they will still have a platform to extend back to what Harmattan offers today....

http://my-meltemi.com is ready to go Wink
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PostPosted: Friday, 09.Mar.2012 18:08    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

P.S. That they decided to use Linux (most probably Maemo 6 / Harmattan) as a base for the feature phone system most probably means that Windows Phone couldn't be used for it. It's probably too resource hungry to run on low-end feature-phone hardware, and I guess it's also too difficult to customize it for this kind of device....

Feature phones have to be cheap. And they couldn't be cheap with WP onboard if it takes 512 MB to normally run, and on 256 MB (as Microsoft recently stated) its functionality has to be seriously restricted. I guess the same applies to the CPU frequency - below 1 GHz it probably enters the turtle mode Wink And WP8 will most probably require 1 GB RAM on more to work...

Now, let's remind ourselves that the N900 has 256 MB RAM and 600 MHz processor and on such a hardware setup it offers unrestricted multitasking, full support for 3rd party software, great web browsing, multimedia, etc.
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PostPosted: Friday, 09.Mar.2012 21:01    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

I guess (as I wrote in a different thread) that Meltemi has been created by clever Nokia employees that realizes the stupidity of killing MeeGo. In order to let it survive, they are working on the Meltemi with the "promise" that it's "just a feature phone platform".

The day Eflop is out of the company - I am pretty sure that Meltemi will be used also for smartphones - at that day Nokia can offer the same platform in all products.

Even if they tries to "dumb down" the platform initially, I am pretty sure that it will offer a richer feature set than WP 7. I would almost say that later versions of S40 is more functional than WP 7 already.

The main reason why Meltemi is labelled as a "feature phone" platform is to avoid it being killed by Eflop as being a possible WP 7 competitor. But it will quickly be a smartphone labelled platform when the failure of WP is obvious even for the CEO. Confused
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PostPosted: Friday, 27.Jul.2012 10:35    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Nokia has ditched Meltemi, see Reuters. Excerpt:
    Nokia Nokia scraps phone software to conserve cash: sources
    (Reuters) - Finnish cellphone maker Nokia has ditched the software it was developing to compete with Google's mass-market Android phones, three sources with direct knowledge of the company's plans said, in its latest move to slash costs.

    Loss-making Nokia was hoping the Linux-based software platform, code-named Meltemi, would replace its ageing Series 40 software in more advanced feature phones - mid-range phones that sit between basic models and sophisticated smartphones.

    Scrapping the platform means Nokia will risk losing its strong position in the mass-market, where phones are priced at $100-$200. Nokia controlled more than 20 percent of this market in the first quarter, according to research firm IDC.

    Nokia's Chief Executive Stephen Elop flagged Meltemi in a leaked video in mid-2011, but Nokia has never officially confirmed Meltemi existed. It declined to comment on Thursday.

    In June, Nokia said it would cut 10,000 jobs - one in five staff in its phone business - as it battles to pull the company out of the red. Talks over job cuts are scheduled to end this week in Finland.

    Shares in Nokia extended their gains on Thursday and were 6.1 percent higher at 1.56 euros by 9:28 a.m. EDT (1328 GMT).

    "With the pressure to make extreme cost-savings it is little surprise that it has been cut," said Canalys analyst Pete Cunningham. Launching and maintaining a software platform costs hundreds of millions of euros.

    One of the sources, who works at a supplier, said the original plan was for the first feature phones using Meltemi should to be on the market by now.

    Smartphones such as Apple's iPhone which offer a platform for third-party application developers, is where the industry's strongest growth is. But simpler feature phones, with limited support for third-party software, still account for most phones sold.

    Nokia's Series 40 platform is in around 2 billion cellphones, making it the most ubiquitous software in the market. But it lacks the smartphone-like experience, such as a wide choice of advanced applications, that Meltemi could have offered.

    Google's Android platform has stormed the smartphone market in its first few years. Last quarter it was used in roughly 60 percent of all smartphones sold.

    Nokia last year dumped its own smartphone software platforms in favor of Microsoft's Windows Phone, which has so far had a limited impact, in part due to the high prices of phones using it.

    "The important factor for Nokia is driving Windows Phones prices low enough to bridge the gap with the feature phones Asha range -- that should happen in 2013," said Cunningham.

    IDC analyst Francisco Jeronimo said Nokia has done well by adding new features like full-touch screens and keyboards to its latest Asha range of Series 40 phones.
I thought this was old news since the announcement over a month ago of plans to reduce up to 10,000 positions, see this post.

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PostPosted: Saturday, 28.Jul.2012 00:00    Post subject:   Reply with quote   

Yes it was already clear that the German R&D group that was working on Meltemi had been terminated. Effectively Nokia has cut off all alternatives to WP: Symbian, Maemo/Meego, Meltemi.
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